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What Is The Kettlebell Rack Position

Keeping the weights light while you learn proper technique, maintaining good positions, and working through a full range of motion will ensure steady progression toward your training goals.

author
David Lawrence
• Friday, 16 October, 2020
• 4 min read
kettlebell rack position sport form fitness training kettlebells onnit exercises glance workouts kb sandbag workout log academy swings beginners lift
(Source: www.onnit.com)

In this position, due to the weight of the kettle bell, the wrist is bent backwards and there is a tremendous amount of pressure on the elbow and shoulder. You can see in the picture below, how the kettle bell is pulling the forearm outward away from the midline of the body and creating torque at the elbow and shoulder.

This inefficient rack happens when you grip the kettle bell too tight and you don’t allow it to rotate freely as you transition from the swing to the clean. This simple switch will create an effortless transition to get the handle of the kettle bell diagonally across your palm and crease of your wrist.

The kettle bell front rack can be a game-changing position that can add an extra element to your workouts, but are you sure you're even holding the weights correctly? Before you grab a kettle bell and swing it up into the rack, take note that it's extremely important to pay attention to the grip.

Using the proper form is essential to make sure you're getting the most out of the exercises you do—particularly because of how easy it is to hold the bell lazily and put your wrists and shoulders in danger. You should have full-body tension just holding a front rack, let alone doing squats or any other maneuver.

It's convenient to do this because it makes the rack less strenuous, and it lets you use your upper arms as a sort of “shelf” to sit the kettle bells. Squeeze and grip the kettle bells hard, and work to turn your wrists in as much as possible; this will actively tense your forearms.

kettlebell position rack workout press exercises ab swing routine body kb beginners yurielkaim
(Source: yurielkaim.com)

Constantly Check In Ex says: At the start of each set, you want to work through a checklist for the front rack (strong wrists, tight elbows, pull the arms back to the body), but don't stop working through that checklist either. The more you do this, the better you'll get at establishing your front rack, and the more you learn how to create, generate, and maintain the full-body tension you're supposed to get out of the move.

Brett Williams, NASA Brett Williams, a fitness editor at Men's Health, is a NASM-CPT certified trainer and former pro football player and tech reporter who splits his workout time between strength and conditioning training, martial arts, and running. Ebenezer Samuel, C.S.C.S., is the fitness director of Men's Health and a certified trainer with more than 10 years of training experience.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. The kettlebellrackposition is a position that each and every person working with kettle bells needs to use, whether for the press, jerk, front squat, racked walks, etc.

I will also include some examples and illustrations that will clearly demonstrate how to rack a kettle bell. The position is correct because the kettle bell is placed in such a way that the bell rests comfortably and there is a minimal amount of strain on the muscles.

With the incorrect racking position, all the weight is placed on the deltoid through shoulder flexion and horizontal adduction. Good hand insertion (check free grip PDF) Neutral forearm Elbow flexed Trapezium relaxed Latissimus Doris slightly pulling down Pectoralis major slightly pulling in The elbow is under the weight

kettlebell rack week position
(Source: www.youtube.com)

There are different racking positions for resting, power transfer, pressing, squatting, females, and so on. Learn so much more through our online kettle bell course for at-home users and trainers or buy the book.

Below is a detailed video in which Marcus Filly talks about kettle bell racking for Cross fitters. Marcus was kind enough to film a short tutorial for the Caveman training audience and you can unlock it with a simple share of this page through one of the buttons below.

You’ll also find a link to the 25+ page free e-book called Master Kettle bell Racking that you can download right away. The kettle bell is an extremely diverse training tool and unlike the dumbbell can be held in a variety of ways including the kettlebellrackposition and kettlebellrack hold.

Many kettle bell exercises will use this holding position either exclusively for exercises including the kettle bell row (as shown above), single arm dead lift variations, single arm swings, high pulls, or as a means to transition the KB front rack hold (shown later). The single arm holding position places more load on the shoulder as well as creating rotation through the body which ultimately needs to be counteracted by the core muscles.

Holding the kettle bell with the single hand will also put a greater strain on the grip and forearms muscles. So many beginners often struggle with their grip strength when they first start kettle bell training using this holding position.

kettlebell rack onnit mood workout stress work position ab schulter abstellgleis kein deine ist bell kettle exercises gym equipment kettlebells
(Source: www.pinterest.jp)

The main disadvantage of the “by the body” holding position is that after several repetitions the kettle bell has a tendency to slide down through the hands making the grip challenging and readjustment necessary. The goblet holding position does place additional demands on the wrists as the kettle bell has a tendency to flip and flop backwards and forwards.

However, the instability produced by this holding position can be counteracted by resting the kettle bell against the chest when fatigue sets in. The kettlebellrack hold position is very important to master as you progress your kettle bell training.

During this position the kettle bell is held comfortably against the chest with the arm tucked in, wrist straight, shoulder down and Latissimus Doris muscle engaged. When correctly engaged the KB front rack hold should be sustainable for long periods of time without fatigue.

One common mistake is to wing the elbow out to the side and hold the kettle bell out and close to the shoulder, this position will lead to fatigue very quickly. Great alignment throughout the arm and body as well as wrist strength and balance are required to use this holding position.

The instability of this holding position can be a great way to improve shoulder stability and alignment issues that may need addressing.

Sources
1 www.onnit.com - https://www.onnit.com/academy/how-to-properly-rack-a-kettlebell/
2 www.menshealth.com - https://www.menshealth.com/fitness/a31118497/front-rack-position/
3 www.cavemantraining.com - https://www.cavemantraining.com/kettlebells/kettlebell-rack-position/
4 kettlebellsworkouts.com - https://kettlebellsworkouts.com/kettlebell-holding-positions-need-know/