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What Is A Kettlebell Rack Hold

author
Ellen Grant
• Thursday, 17 December, 2020
• 12 min read

The kettle bell is an extremely diverse training tool and unlike the dumbbell can be held in a variety of ways including the kettlebellrack position and kettlebellrackhold. Many kettle bell exercises will use this holding position either exclusively for exercises including the kettle bell row (as shown above), single arm dead lift variations, single arm swings, high pulls, or as a means to transition the KB front rack hold (shown later).

rack kettlebell holds raze
(Source: www.fitness-superstore.co.uk)

Contents

The single arm holding position places more load on the shoulder as well as creating rotation through the body which ultimately needs to be counteracted by the core muscles. Holding the kettle bell with the single hand will also put a greater strain on the grip and forearms muscles.

So many beginners often struggle with their grip strength when they first start kettle bell training using this holding position. The main disadvantage of the “by the body” holding position is that after several repetitions the kettle bell has a tendency to slide down through the hands making the grip challenging and readjustment necessary.

The goblet holding position does place additional demands on the wrists as the kettle bell has a tendency to flip and flop backwards and forwards. However, the instability produced by this holding position can be counteracted by resting the kettle bell against the chest when fatigue sets in.

During this position the kettle bell is held comfortably against the chest with the arm tucked in, wrist straight, shoulder down and Latissimus Doris muscle engaged. When correctly engaged the KB front rack hold should be sustainable for long periods of time without fatigue.

One common mistake is to wing the elbow out to the side and hold the kettle bell out and close to the shoulder, this position will lead to fatigue very quickly. For example, a badly designed kettle bell can pinch the wrist or feel very uncomfortable against the forearm.

kettlebell rack sport body kettlebells storage weight racks hold shelf mat adjustable exercise floor
(Source: store.soolis.com)

Great alignment throughout the arm and body as well as wrist strength and balance are required to use this holding position. The instability of this holding position can be a great way to improve shoulder stability and alignment issues that may need addressing.

Keeping the weights light while you learn proper technique, maintaining good positions, and working through a full range of motion will ensure steady progression toward your training goals. This rack position needs to be strong and firmly imprinted in your head so you’ll be able to direct the kettle bell there during your work sets.

In this position, due to the weight of the kettle bell, the wrist is bent backwards and there is a tremendous amount of pressure on the elbow and shoulder. You can see in the picture below, how the kettle bell is pulling the forearm outward away from the midline of the body and creating torque at the elbow and shoulder.

This inefficient rack happens when you grip the kettle bell too tight and you don’t allow it to rotate freely as you transition from the swing to the clean. This simple switch will create an effortless transition to get the handle of the kettle bell diagonally across your palm and crease of your wrist.

The kettle bell front rack can be a game-changing position that can add an extra element to your workouts, but are you sure you're even holding the weights correctly? Before you grab a kettle bell and swing it up into the rack, take note that it's extremely important to pay attention to the grip.

rack kettlebell storage dumbbell racks company weights physical kettlebells physioroom strength training holds gym equipment enlarge
(Source: www.physioroom.com)

It's convenient to do this because it makes the rack less strenuous, and it lets you use your upper arms as a sort of “shelf” to sit the kettle bells. Squeeze and grip the kettle bells hard, and work to turn your wrists in as much as possible; this will actively tense your forearms.

Constantly Check In Ex says: At the start of each set, you want to work through a checklist for the front rack (strong wrists, tight elbows, pull the arms back to the body), but don't stop working through that checklist either. The more you do this, the better you'll get at establishing your front rack, and the more you learn how to create, generate, and maintain the full-body tension you're supposed to get out of the move.

Brett Williams, NASA Brett Williams, a fitness editor at Men's Health, is a NASM-CPT certified trainer and former pro football player and tech reporter who splits his workout time between strength and conditioning training, martial arts, and running. Ebenezer Samuel, C.S.C.S., is the fitness director of Men's Health and a certified trainer with more than 10 years of training experience.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. Those large cannonballs with handles, sitting in the corner collecting dust, look intriguing.

But you're not about to start at the bottom, in the “pump” class with puny yellow and pink kettle bells that look like they belong in the daycare. And as much as I love basic kettle bell moves like the swing, get-up, and snatch, I also recognize that not everyone is ready to subject themselves to the learning curve that goes along with those movements.

kettlebell rack position sport form fitness training kettlebells onnit exercises glance workouts kb sandbag workout log academy swings beginners lift
(Source: www.onnit.com)

By that, I mean that strength in awkward positions that fighters and other athletes seem to have in spades, but that barbells, dumbbells, and machines seldom produce. The task is simple: You're simply going to carry a pair of kettle bells for either distance or time.

The suitcase setup and execution is exactly the same as the farmer's carry, with the obvious exception of having that extra kettle bell for balance. Bend down as if you were about to dead lift the kettle bell and grab the handle with your working hand.

The kettle bell will be resting on two points of contact: The back of your wrist and on your upper arm, just below your shoulder. Your forearm and upper arm will form a triangle in which the kettle bell sits.

Your hand should be facing the center of your body, and your elbow pointed down toward your hip. It adds a level of difficulty to the carry that many people find surprising, in the form of increased abdominal stress, respiration demand, and the way it reaches the little stabilizer muscles along your spine.

To perform the rack walk, simply cheat curl the weight up to the clean position as you did with the rack hold, and then take off. Many gym rats and bodybuilders don't have the necessary wrist and shoulder flexibility to perform a true barbell front squat with a clean grip.

kettlebell rack workout onnit stress mood training ball hit equipment relieve circuit
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

Holding one or two kettle bells also puts a larger-than-normal pressure on the abs, making them work harder than a far greater barbell load would, as I mentioned in my last article. Additionally, I consider the kettle bell front squat to be an incredibly effective “loaded mobility” exercise.

Because of the way the load is situated, your abs automatically contract, your shoulders depress, and your hips magically seem to have more space in them, allowing for a deeper squat than many people can manage with just a barbell. It also serves as a little assessment, since if the two sides feel dramatically different, there's a good chance you have a side-to-side imbalance.

If that's the case, you may not want to load with a heavy barbell, due to the possibility of injury, until you spend some good time with the kettle bell alternative. Squat until you go as low as you can, maintaining pressure in your abs, and keeping a slight extension in your lower back.

The single-arm floor press will not only strengthen your triceps and your lockout, but it will help you refine your bench press groove by positioning your arm in the strongest position to lift big weights. Roll to your side, and grab the kettle bell by the handle, using the pistol grip, like you did with the rack hold.

Pause with your upper arm on the floor for 2-3 seconds and then press the kettle bell. Experienced kettle bell lifters regularly utilize things like loaded carries and floor presses to address strength deficiencies and practice building tension.

kettlebell rack storage kettlebells company physical dumbbell physioroom enlarge holds racks equipment weights gym
(Source: www.physioroom.com)

When you're ready, the floor press also has the benefit of preparing your arms and shoulders for one of the best kettle bell exercises you can do: the Turkish get-up. Until then, just keep picking up those heavy beasts, squeezing your core for all it's worth, and holding on for dear life.

My plan is: 5×1 rack hold starting at 30 sec Mom, gradually push it to 1 min, so basically each minute I just switch arms. I hope to: get a better rack, to set up my clean and my press better.

Loaded Cleans are a great place to start... TUT Time under tension. Next move to Front Squats, (yes front squats help big time in the press) then move to 5 FS to 1 min.

Gray Cook advocates to do flexed arm and straight arm hangs for time to help with pull up training, especially getting your first a couple of pull ups. He says if you spend a lot of time in both end ranges and get strong there your body figures out the “in-between” on its own.

In Etc, more precisely the Etc Bonus material, Pavel recommends loaded cleans and Thus with a heavier KB to increase ones press. If you think about if it's the same concept of getting comfortable with a heavy weight in both end ranges of the movement.

kettlebell rack hold personal trainer vegas las
(Source: www.youtube.com)

Gray Cook advocates to do flexed arm and straight arm hangs for time to help with pull up training, especially getting your first a couple of pull ups. He says if you spend a lot of time in both end ranges and get strong there your body figures out the “in-between” on its own.

In Etc, more precisely the Etc Bonus material, Pavel recommends loaded cleans and Thus with a heavier KB to increase ones press. If you think about if it's the same concept of getting comfortable with a heavy weight in both end ranges of the movement.

I tested again yesterday, I could grind through 1×1 each arm, which I haven't been able to do before, even on a day when I was tired after work. The ability to put it up every day will be a great tool for getting used to the movement with the bell.

The big plateau breaker will of course be, when I can put the bell up 1×2. My plan is: 5×1 rack hold starting at 30 sec Mom, gradually push it to 1 min, so basically each minute I just switch arms.

I hope to: get a better rack, to set up my clean and my press better. Rack Holds are an isometric action that strengthens the core stabilizer muscles, along some other, as the video Ryan posted went into.

rack kettlebell stealth commercial kettlebells holds
(Source: www.ukgymequipment.com)

As Dr Stuart McGill noted, a weak core causes “Leakage”. That means greater force is produce from a solid stable platform than an unstable one.

60 Second Holds While this is one method of increasing core stability strength, a more effective option would be shorter hold (15 to 30 seconds) with a heaver weight. 2) Additional Core Training: Various ab, erector and upper thoracic exercise that strength the core will enable you to produce more force, drive more weight up, in you press.

Exercises like: Turkish Get Up (As Elephant posted, ...” Pavel recommends... Thus with a heavier KB to increase ones press”, Sit Ups, Crunches, Back Raises, Upper Thoracic Back Extension, etc will help. Rack Holds are an isometric action that strengthens the core stabilizer muscles, along some other, as the video Ryan posted went into.

As Dr Stuart McGill noted, a weak core causes “Leakage”. That means greater force is produce from a solid stable platform than an unstable one.

60 Second Holds While this is one method of increasing core stability strength, a more effective option would be shorter hold (15 to 30 seconds) with a heaver weight. 2) Additional Core Training: Various ab, erector and upper thoracic exercise that strength the core will enable you to produce more force, drive more weight up, in you press.

hold rack kettlebell
(Source: www.youtube.com)

Exercises like: Turkish Get Up (As Elephant posted, ...” Pavel recommends... Thus with a heavier KB to increase ones press”, Sit Ups, Crunches, Back Raises, Upper Thoracic Back Extension, etc will help. My “problem” bell is the 24 kg, I can press it on a lucky rested day, but not at will.

The determinate factor of it being a Power or Speed Movement is the Training Percentage of your 1 Repetition Max. Power Training Percentages are between 48 -62% of your 1 Repetition Max with Traditional Strength Exercises; Speed Training Percentages are between 10 to 40% of your 1 Repetition Max.

You then preform a Power Movement, ramming the weight up as hard and fast as you can with each rep. You Rest. Research has demonstrated that when a heavy Strength Movement is preformed prior to a Power or Speed Movement, a greater amount of force is produced.

A heavy Overload Press Hold can be use as the Strength Movement. The Strength Movement need to heavy enough to elicit greater Power.

It is the Strength Movement is too heavy, it dampens Power Output. The determinate factor of it being a Power or Speed Movement is the Training Percentage of your 1 Repetition Max.

rack hold front kettlebell
(Source: www.youtube.com)

Power Training Percentages are between 48 -62% of your 1 Repetition Max with Traditional Strength Exercises; Speed Training Percentages are between 10 to 40% of your 1 Repetition Max. You then preform a Power Movement, ramming the weight up as hard and fast as you can with each rep. You Rest.

Research has demonstrated that when a heavy Strength Movement is preformed prior to a Power or Speed Movement, a greater amount of force is produced. A heavy Overload Press Hold can be use as the Strength Movement.

The Strength Movement need to heavy enough to elicit greater Power. It is the Strength Movement is too heavy, it dampens Power Output.

I find it interesting that no one has yet suggested you look at Sou & Tuba to get stronger pressing kettle bells. You might find it to be a good way to get to your goal of 1×2 with the 24 kg at the end of the 6 weeks.

I tested again yesterday, I could grind through 1×1 each arm, which I haven't been able to do before, even on a day when I was tired after work. The ability to put it up every day will be a great tool for getting used to the movement with the bell.

kettlebell rack kettlebells holds
(Source: gymequipment.co.uk)

The big plateau breaker will of course be, when I can put the bell up 1×2. I find it interesting that no one has yet suggested you look at Sou & Tuba to get stronger pressing kettle bells.

Other Articles You Might Be Interested In

01: Russian Term For Kettlebell
02: Russian Word For Kettlebell
03: Hs Code For Kettlebell
04: Buy Kettlebells Vancouver
Sources
1 www.walmart.ca - https://www.walmart.ca/en/sports-rec/exercise-fitness/strength-weight-training/kettlebells/N-4574
2 www.treadmillfactory.ca - https://www.treadmillfactory.ca/kettlebells
3 kettlebellcanada.ca - http://kettlebellcanada.ca/
4 fitnessexchange.com - https://fitnessexchange.com/collections/weights-dumbbells
5 www.johnsonfitness.com - https://www.johnsonfitness.com/Used-Exercise-Equipment/Index
6 www.bowflex.com - https://www.bowflex.com/selecttech/
7 primofitnessusa.com - https://primofitnessusa.com/used-gym-equipment-for-sale/