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The Kettlebell Snatch: The Mother Of All Kettlebell Exercises

It trains the commonly weak posterior chain muscles (glutes, hamstrings) like no other exercise, and it strengthens the core. The snatch is a beautiful, explosive movement that gets the posterior chain firing and core engaged, and it helps to stabilize the shoulder.

author
Ellen Grant
• Wednesday, 28 October, 2020
• 7 min read
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

Step 1: Stand with feet between hip and shoulder-width apart, holding a kettle bell in your right hand at shoulder level. Step 2: With your shoulders drawn back and downward (think: proud chest), press the bell straight overhead, locking out your elbow.

Step 3: Lower the weight back to the rack position, where the bell is shoulder level and your forearm is vertical. Step 4: Now bend your forearm inward toward the midline of your body while simultaneously extending your elbow.

Maintain your proud chest position as the bell hikes back, so that your shoulders are square to the floor. Step 5: When your hips are fully bent, extend them explosively to stand tall again.

As you get comfortable with the movement, you can begin the snatch from the rack position, and then by simply hiking it from the floor (as shown in the video above). As mentioned in the directions above, if you have an unstable or misaligned overhead lockout position, then you are not ready to embrace the snatch.

These muscles extend the hips, and are responsible for generating the power and quickness you need in virtually all sports. While you don’t press the weight overhead to finish the movement, flinging it up with the power of your hips and then having to “catch” the bell and decelerate its upward trajectory forces your stabilizer muscles to clamp down hard.

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As a matter of fact, the kettlebellsnatch can be a great alternative to the overhead press if you are having shoulder issues. It helps create more thoracic mobility—the ability to extend your upper back (stand tall).

The movement also bypasses the AC joint, so if you have pain due to impingement in this area, the one-arm snatch shouldn’t aggravate it. It is a good alternative to traditional aerobic activities because there is no impact on the joints, as there is with running and jumping rope.

A recent study examined 17 female NCAA Division 1 soccer players who undertook a snatch program for 4 weeks. Starting the snatch from the floor will build incredible upper-body pulling strength and core stability.

However, it requires you to own the dead lift position, picking the bell up off the floor, and that means a greater range of motion. Step 2: Get your shoulders in a proud chest position and hinge your hips to grasp the kettle bell with your right hand.

Step 3: Explosively extend your hips and pull the kettle bell up, keeping it close to your body. Step 4: As it passes head level, allow the kettle bell to rotate around the forearm as you punch through at the top.

kettlebell workout core swing
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Tips and Safety: Avoid rounding your back in order to pick up the kettle bell. If the basic snatch is too challenging, regress to this version, which allows you to focus on the hip action and punch-through more safely.

Step 3: Pack your shoulders into the proud chest position and hinge your hips to grasp the kettle bell with your left hand, wrist slightly flexed. Step 5: As it passes head level, allow the kettle bell to rotate around the forearm as you punch through at the top.

Tips and Safety: Avoid rounding your back in order to pick up the kettle bell. This snatch variation is excellent for building rotational power as well as shoulder strength and flexibility.

Step 3: Rotate back to where your shoulders and hips are square, rack the weight, and repeat. Tips and Safety: Exhale at the point of exertion and maintain a long spine throughout the movement.

Keep a slightly loose grip to avoid tearing your hands or calluses. This means unraveling the bell and straightening your arm quickly to allow the swing across the body to be smooth.

kettlebell workout onnit academy training flyexercise
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The double snatch builds tremendous upper-body pulling strength as well as core and posterior chain power. Step 2: With a shoulder-width stance, hinge and grasp the kettle bells while keeping a straight back.

As they start to pass your legs pull up hard while keeping the bells close to your body. Step 5: As the bells pass your chest, start rotating so that the kettle bells will be put into position to punch through at the top.

Tips and Safety: Exhale at the point of exertion and maintain a long spine throughout the movement. Keep a slightly loose grip to avoid tearing your hands or calluses.

The QUEEN to the Kettle bell Swing KING or why not, the holy grail of full body exercises is the KettlebellSnatch. There are also timing issues necessary for the Snatch to avoid banging the wrists and jerking the arm.

The KB Snatch works the entire body from head to toe and is considered a pulling movement. KB snatches are certainly a cardiovascular exercise although not as much as the High Pull because you can grab periods of rest at the top of the movement.

breakingmuscle
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The more muscles you use the more energy required and subsequently the more carbohydrates and fat you burn. If you want to really push your cardio then the snatch will really elevate your heart rate without the need to even move your feet.

The snatch requires you to absorb and regenerate force at speed during every repetition. The snatch takes the kettle bell from overhead to close to the floor and back again in a matter of seconds.

Poor shoulder and thoracic mobility will be highlighted during the snatch and demand attention. As well as being mobile the shoulders also need to be stable, so they can support the heavy load overhead.

We are talking the quads, hips, glutes, core and hamstrings are all certainly worked very hard just like with the Kettle bell Swing. Unlike the swing you get a little more muscle activation at the top of the body due to the fact that the kettle bell goes overhead.

Poor shoulder and thoracic mobility could lead to problems but I’ll address that issue in a little while. Once you start practicing the snatch, one area that you will notice gets worked hard is the grip.

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The snatch is a beautiful, explosive movement that gets the posterior chain firing and core engaged, and it helps to stabilize the shoulder. It increases your heart rate, engages the whole body, and trains up your weaknesses.

Maintain your proud chest position as the bell hikes back, so that your shoulders are square to the floor. As you get comfortable with the movement, you can begin the snatch from the rack position, and then by simply hiking it from the floor (as shown in the video above).

It trains the commonly weak posterior chain muscles like no other exercise. It strengthens the core and has been found to combat back pain in many individuals.

The snatch is a beautiful explosive movement that gets the posterior chain firing, core engaged and shoulder stabilizing. A ragged and inefficient snatch can usually be traced back to a deficient swing.

Whilst you will no doubt incorporate your grip and shoulder muscles you do not want these to be the primary movers. A vast majority of people have weak posterior muscles and conditioning.

kettlebell cast iron cap barbell grey lbs weights walmart body pounds
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The snatch is the perfect remedy when performed with a powerful hip hinge. A word of caution here, if you have an unstable or misaligned overhead lockout position then you are not ready to embrace the snatch.

The overhead position is paramount as the bell spends a majority of the time here. Holding the bell overhead is paramount in developing shoulder stability.

You need to quickly decelerate and stabilize the kettle bell and this is just incredible for building strength and stability. The extra thoracic mobility you have with a single arm snatch and the fact that it bypasses the AC joint are why it works.

Much like the kettle bell swing the kettlebellsnatch is a magnificent movement for developing your aerobic capacity. A recent study examined 17 female NCAA Division 1 soccer players who undertook a snatch program for 4 weeks.

Sources
1 www.onnit.com - https://www.onnit.com/academy/kettlebell-snatch/
2 www.warriorgoddesskettlebelltraining.com - https://www.warriorgoddesskettlebelltraining.com/the-queen-of-all-kettlebell-exercises-the-snatch/
3 functionaltraininginstitute.com - https://functionaltraininginstitute.com/kettlebell-snatch/