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MoreHow Heavy Should Your Kettlebell Be?

Though kettle bells have grown in popularity in recent years, there is still so much room for people to learn, especially beginners. Trying to answer how heavy should my first kettle bell be for a beginner can feel overwhelming, mainly because it’s likely they have never used one.

author
Paul Gonzalez
• Thursday, 29 October, 2020
• 10 min read

We’ll help you determine the weight of your first kettle bell so you can get your training started as soon as possible. For beginners, this is probably the biggest hurdle you are likely to face when purchasing your first kettle bell.

Most men often tend to start out with kettle bell weights that are heavy for them. Once you feel confident and hardly break a sweat, you can switch to a 20 kg or 44-pound kettle bell.

On the other hand, most women tend to start out with a light kettle bell. The type of kettle bell you choose can either limit or improve yourkettlebell workout experience.

The construction is also different, competition kettle bells mostly consist of steel, which makes them more durable than their cast iron counterpart. Given their versatility, you can use them for a wider range of exercises than competition kettle bells.

However, once you master proper technique and form, you can proceed to use competition kettle bells. A seam that hasn’t been filed down can make working out a painful experience.

The diameter of the kettle bell ’s handle is another essential factor to consider when purchasing one. After all, nobody wants to struggle to place their hands inside the handle when working out.

Therefore, make sure you find a kettle bell that will comfortably fit the size of your hands. Another important factor to consider when choosing the right kettle bell to purchase is its base.

A kettle bell base helps prevent marks on your floor. For workouts like renegade rows, you will require one with a flat base.

A good rule of thumb for choosing your lighter kettle bell is picking one up, racking it at your shoulder, and performing several single-arm overhead presses with it. “If you are new to fitness, begin on the lighter side, but if you have experience and a general knowledge of lifting weights, the heavier option should suffice,” she said.

“As with any exercise, consistency, even over a short period of time, will improve your strength dramatically, so choose weights you can have longevity and grow with.” Kettle bells aren’t cheap, so investing lots of money into something which is too heavy or too light for you can be problematic.

Choosing the right weight is important since you can tailor your workout to suit you and also make it as effective as possible. There isn’t just one version of a kettle bell, although they are all a very similar shape in that they look like a kettle and can be lifted easily from the sturdy handle at the top.

You won’t be wasting all of your time entirely, but it will make your workout less effective than it could potentially be. You should always start off with lighter weights, as this will give you a good indication as to how much you can handle and how many reps you can do.

When you start lifting any weights which are too heavy for you, you run the risk of doing yourself an injury. Apart from straining yourself, you won’t enjoy your workouts since it will be too much of a struggle to lift the weights properly.

If you’re new to weightlifting and/or kettle bells, you should start off with a weight of 5-8 pounds, depending on your fitness levels. But you may be wondering if it is worth it or not to incorporate yet another type of exercise into your workout regimen.

You can either burn fat with cardio or build muscle with strength training. When you do kettle bell exercises properly, you will burn plenty of fat and get your blood pumping.

At the same time, because the kettle bell is a weight, you will be exercising your muscles and helping them to grow. Now, kettle bell exercises alone will not build the same amount of muscle as pure strength training.

But, for those of you who are trying to build muscle and are worried that you are not getting enough cardio, kettle bell exercises are a good way of doing both. Regular strength training exercises can result in serious damage being done to joints, muscles, bones, etc., if they are not done properly.

We get asked frequently when one should consider increasing the weight of the kettle bell they use, the answer is it depends! Depending on your lifting goals, if you can perform these amount of reps with yourkettlebell you should consider getting a heavier kettle bell

So, if your goal is one of those, and you can correctly perform that amount of reps with yourkettlebell, it might be time to move up to a new weight! With proper technique, you should be able to snatch 180 reps with a weight before seriously moving on.

We recommend you read more about receiving a quick, free, dynamic kettle bell workout every week you can click below. We recommend you subscribe to our posts so you can be notified when we publish more in this series.

Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell but injured my back due to stupidity in technique, so I gave it a go again last month with a lighter weight and went with an 8 kg. I have experienced some weight loss with the garbage around my waist starting to fade but I have not gained any muscle.

I can still see my rib cage and my neck looks like what you see on Bill Clinton and Al Sharpton. I believe I am ready to move on now to a higher weight as the 8 kg feels at times like swinging a doll but am I looking for one that would help both with cardio and boosting muscle growth.

The 24 kg and 32 kg seem more of a preferred choice among those who have experienced solid gains and developed transformations but I'm not sure if that is too big a leap. Basically, I'd like to hear about your individual experiences on what weight(s) you have used to notice a growth in your physique.

This is quite helpful and yes, I am also limited financially, so I am looking for a weight which I will not outgrow fairly quickly. Generally how long do users incorporate 24 kg before finding it to light?

Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably? I am able to work the 40 kg on some moves (swings, goblets & TGU) but still use the 24 a lot.

I am able to work the 40 kg on some moves (swings, goblets & TGU) but still use the 24 a lot. Level 9 Valued Member Master Certified Instructor

Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell but injured my back due to stupidity in technique, so I gave it a go again last month with a lighter weight and went with an 8 kg. I have experienced some weight loss with the garbage around my waist starting to fade but I have not gained any muscle.

I can still see my rib cage and my neck looks like what you see on Bill Clinton and Al Sharpton. I believe I am ready to move on now to a higher weight as the 8 kg feels at times like swinging a doll but am I looking for one that would help both with cardio and boosting muscle growth.

The 24 kg and 32 kg seem more of a preferred choice among those who have experienced solid gains and developed transformations but I'm not sure if that is too big a leap. Basically, I'd like to hear about your individual experiences on what weight(s) you have used to notice a growth in your physique.

I will suggest an alternative approach:#1 technique first — simultaneously, focus on better food and more rest #2 then build strength #3 and then focus on hypertrophy (hint — if you follow #1 and #2, you will most likely hit #3 goal without even trying) Hard to suggest weight — we don't know what is your technique, current strength level, what exercises do you use, etc.

Basically you could still progress with it... Do dead lifts, 2 arm swings, progress to one arm swings, practice cleans, try to press it with leg drive until you can strict press it. This is quite helpful and yes, I am also limited financially, so I am looking for a weight which I will not outgrow fairly quickly.

Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably? “Beginner” has a very wide range of physical starting states, even if all people are equally new to kettle bells.

swing, welcome to Strongest Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell ... I believe I am ready to move on now to a higher weight as the 8 kg feels at times like swinging a doll but am I looking for one that would help both with cardio and boosting muscle growth.

In the meantime buy a 24 kg to get ready for the next progression. Are you following any particular program like Simple & Sinister? Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably?

I am able to work the 40 kg on some moves (swings, goblets & TGU) but still use the 24 a lot. Obviously the selection of lifts should be thought through carefully (to avoid trauma) and training has to be planned.

I started my Strongest journey with the purchase of a 24 and a Kindle copy of Simple&Sinister. “Beginner” has a very wide range of physical starting states, even if all people are equally new to kettle bells.

It describes how to progress. As to brand, I think most are likely OK for 2 hand swings, but I can say for sure that Rogue is good. I purchased a used copy of Simple & Sinister from Casebooks and hope to receive it by early next week.

Unfortunately I no longer have the 16 kg kettle bell as I returned it shortly after injuring my back. I would consider buying another 16 kg but would prefer a weight that would stay challenging for a while and help with building muscle.

When the book arrives, I will start incorporating the exercises in the program with the 8 kg to get a feel but plan on going forward with a heavier weight. Besides Rogue and Kettle bell Kings, are there any other brands that offer wide handles?

Do any of you have any experiences with the Pavel Brand kettle bells that are sold on the Strongest online store? I do not think it is a mistake to invest in a small collection of Kettle bells from 8,16,24,32 at least (I have more), but the 32 gave me what the 24 never could, but I would not be there without the 16 and the 24.

I do not think it is a mistake to invest in a small collection of Kettle bells from 8,16,24,32 at least (I have more), but the 32 gave me what the 24 never could, but I would not be there without the 16 and the 24. For hypertrophy, you need a heavier KB than whatever you're comfortably doing volume with now (progressive overload).

Set Simple as your objective goal & let the The come with it (Help Me Screw Things Up). My wife yelled at me when the FedEx guy was struggling up the driveway with double 32s.....

To add to the already good suggestions above, if you only want to do swing, and you really only can afford one kettle bell, the 24 should probably be your go-to bell for now. 16 will be outgrown very fast in most cases for men, unless you have existing medical conditions or are of very small build.

If you then cannot add more kettle bells, you can do the progression: dead lifts (to practice hinging, bracing, ..., you will get the drills in SAS), 2 hands swings, 1 hand swings, snatch (you may or may not need a lighter kettle bell to learn the snatch though). If you also want to do other moves that involve arm and shoulder muscles (TGU, press, ...), you will probably also need at least the 16, unless you are already quite strong.

A kettle bell is of no benefit unless it is an appropriate weight for your level of strength and technique, for the drills you are using it for, and for your goals and programming. Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably?

I own and have used a selection of DragonDoor, Rogue, and Perform Better cast iron bells, and competition bells from Kettle bell Kings and Kettle bells USA (as well as briefly handling a number of other brands). They may be usable for two-arm swings, but none of them are comfortable. And I think chasing big bells for two arm swings is not an economic strategy, and not necessary to any training goals.

For overloading swings specifically, a T-handle (manufactured or DIY) is much more economical (and comfortable). New York Barbell has these TDS wide handle kettle bells for sale.

I haven't used one, so I can't speak to their fit and finish but the handles look wider than normal in the picture. The question I would be asking myself is... “have I corrected my form issues?” You said you screwed your back up with a 16 kg and poor technique so you bought a 8k.

You can get away with it with light weight but moving up to a 24 kg is just asking for more trouble if your form isn’t spot on.

Sources
1 www.simplefitnesshub.com - https://www.simplefitnesshub.com/how-heavy-should-my-first-kettlebell-be/
2 www.popsugar.com - https://www.popsugar.com/fitness/how-heavy-should-kettlebell-be-for-beginners-46848503
3 weweight.com - https://weweight.com/how-heavy-should-kettlebell-be
4 www.kettlebellkings.com - https://www.kettlebellkings.com/blog/when-to-increase-your-kettlebell-training-weight/
5 www.strongfirst.com - https://www.strongfirst.com/community/threads/how-heavy-a-kettlebell-to-build-muscle.14714/