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Kettlebell Vs Bodyweight

author
Bob Roberts
• Sunday, 13 December, 2020
• 10 min read

I can subsist on a relatively spartan diet of training exercises. In fact, I think it was Dan John who talked about matching your training to the seasons.

exercise bodyweight vs kettlebell
(Source: www.youtube.com)

Contents

My goal is 5 sets of 20 consecutive reps of Pistols on each leg. This morning I decided to see if they had improved my KB press at all, even for just a couple reps. Not one bit.

Pressing the 16 kg even felt kind of “heavy” for those couple reps, whereas at one point I was doing ladders of (1,2,3,4,5) in the past. And I only got one ugly rep with the 25 kg for each arm. I have two details to note first: A) I have tried pressing KB's a handful of times throughout the last 6 months or so to test this, and with the same result.

Edit: A third thing: I have been doing deep pike push ups (elbows all the way to ribs) consistently for a couple of weeks, and sporadically for weeks leading up to now. Lastly, I should note that the reverse held true when I was doing KB ladders: my pike push ups, even on the floor, felt atrociously hard.

I do understand that the KB press travels more in-line with the body, whereas the pike push up/HSP has the hands slightly in front/anterior to the body line. However, I thought that the huge amount of stress placed on the shoulder girdle and anterior deltoid in the pikes/HSP would help, not hinder the KB press.

Which is way more than the weight of my KB's. Is it possible that the KB press isolates the shoulder girdle more, or differently, since pike push ups have the feet off-center, thus “supporting” the movement in a way? I have seen that phenomenon in myself when I wasn't doing any push ups, only KB presses, and then I had no problem doing push ups.... I have also seen some calisthenics athletes say that if you can't military press your own body weight, then a HSP is out of the question.

kettlebell bodyweight
(Source: www.youtube.com)

Which is way more than the weight of my KB's. Is it possible that the KB press isolates the shoulder girdle more, or differently, since pike push ups have the feet off-center, thus “supporting” the movement in a way? Also, check the load with pike push up at bottom and top, there could be a large let-off as it goes up.

I should note that the scale fluctuates a bit while doing that test, thus I gave the range.... it did read about 148lbs or so, and I weigh 160, so it's taking the majority of my weight, at least at one point in the motion. I may be an outlier here, but the only body weight pressing movement that ever had significant carryover for me was dips (weighted or not).

However, I think you may be positively pleased with the results of your weighted push-ups routine. Pike push-ups and HSP can maintain or even improve the regular KB press.

For instance, HSP training maintains my max KB press with the 28 kg. I would add a steady diet of HLR because no matter what, HSP engages less the core than the regular Cap.

With the KB you also have to start from the weakest position without a stretch reflex. To really mimics the exact ROM of a KB press, one should perform pikes or HSP using a deficit.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

However, I think you may be positively pleased with the results of your weighted push-ups routine. Pike push-ups and HSP can maintain or even improve the regular KB press.

For instance, HSP training maintains my max KB press with the 28 kg. I would add a steady diet of HLR because no matter what, HSP engages less the core than the regular Cap.

What I feel best on is low reps for ~5 sets at a fairly high frequency. I have thought of doing a Top with the pike push ups, but due to a nervous system dysregulation I have (long story short = sympathetic overdrive), I think it is best that I avoid high-volume training sessions for the time being.

I have also noted that if a pike push up or HSP is done with strict hollow form (minimal arching, glutes engaged, ribs stay down through the entire motion) there is indeed quite a degree of core engagement. Doing pike push ups with strict posterior pelvic tilt demonstrates this quite well.

Hello, I have thought of doing a Top with the pike push ups, but due to a nervous system dysregulation I have (long story short = sympathetic overdrive), I think it is best that I avoid high-volume training sessions for the time being. What I feel best on is low reps for ~5 sets at a fairly high frequency.

kettlebell strength
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

5 sets of 3 reps, 6 days a week, usually superseded with weighted pull ups. This kind of “daily dose” works fairly well.2 weeks into the motion may be short.

Obviously, I am far from experienced, but I noticed that I tend to need at least 4 weeks to really dig deep into a training / motion, and to then really assess it. Alongside it, I would still keep pressing (even very light) to secure the motor pathway.

Yeah... My main goals aren't KB related, but I found it odd that I saw such little carryover, and started the thread more to discuss the idea. Both pull ups and dips always procured for me a tremendous carryover to a wide range of exercises (not just overhead pressing).

That’s why I consider them the upper body squat (dips) and dead lift (pull ups). For instance at the beginning, I did not engage the glutes, and so had trouble to brace my core.

When I discovered kettle bells, I was hooked immediately and stopped training with dumbbells and machines. My favorite moves in 2005, when I first wrote an article for Bodybuilding.com, are some same ones I rely on today.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Teaching these methods for over 12 years has resulted in thousands of happy people becoming stronger, leaner, and more conditioned. Another great thing about kettle bell training is that it blends so perfectly with classic body weight strength movements like push-ups, pull-ups, and planks.

Another great thing about kettle bell training is that it blends so perfectly with classic body weight strength movements like push-ups, pull-ups, and planks. It will teach you the valuable skill of overall tension and staying tight.

I've also been known to call it the nonsurgical butt lift, for reasons that will become apparent once you're in the middle of a hard set. Gently stomp your foot into the ground, making sure all five toes are rooted to the floor.

It's imperative that you're stabilizing leg and heel are firmly planted on the floor. As you hinge, the rear leg should be as straight as possible, with minimal knee bend, to keep your spine aligned properly.

Make sure your chest doesn’t drop lower than your hips for optimal safety. As you hinge and sit deep in to the dead lift position, feel for the bell(s) placed right outside your stabilizing foot.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Once you are properly hinged and set up, firmly grip the handle of the kettle bell, make sure your shoulder is pulled back so your lat engages properly during the entire movement. Exhale and stand up by hinging your hips forward while bringing the bell(s) with you.

It provides strength and conditioning in a single package, building your glutes, quads, lats, and abs. If yours isn't perfect, consider fortifying it with the one drill that has never failed me or my clients in the past.

Find what feels challenging but not overwhelming to your current strength level or balance. Take a natural squat stance, making sure your knees are aligned with your ankles.

Sniff in and hike the bell back, keeping your weight on your heels. Explode through the hips while keeping your arms both straight and loose.

Squeeze the glutes tight every time you thrust, bracing your abs to protect your spine. Your breathing should be a powerful inhale through your nose to your abdomen at the bottom of the swing.

kettlebell workout
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

As you snap your hips, let out a fast little breath to brace your spine. Your breathing should be shallow and strong, and be sure to keep your abs pressurized throughout the set.

Keep the handle at the base of the palm and your wrist straight. Inhale, then roll to the opposite elbow and punch the kettle bell up, keeping your eyes on it.

Lift your hip up and bring your opposite leg back behind you. Once you are back to the lunge position, keep your eyes on the bell for the rest of the descent.

OK, I know I limited myself to three favorite movements in the video, but I can't help but mention the squat here. Kettle bell front-squat variations of all types are outstanding for building strength in the legs, back, and abs, as well as mobility in the hips.

Take a breath and slowly lower yourself down, using your elbows to push your knees out and open your hips. Only go as low as feels comfortable, and focus on improving your depth over time.

weight kettlebell combos rapid loss body
(Source: www.mensjournal.com)

Pressurize your abdomen and straighten out, pushing steadily through your heels as you ascend back to the top position. If you become fatigued to the point where you lose form, I advise you to stop immediately or go down to a lighter weight.

Don't be surprised if your athletic performance improves after a few weeks of adding this type of training into your life. There are endless possibilities of fun and extremely difficult things you can do with just one or two kettle bells, your body, and a few feet of floor space.

Avoid injury and keep your form in check with in-depth instructional videos. How-to Images View our enormous library of workout photos and see exactly how each exercise should be done before you give it a shot.

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Sources
1 www.fab-ent.com - https://www.fab-ent.com/exercise/weights/cando-kettlebells/
2 en.wikipedia.org - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kettlebell