logo
About    |    Archive

Kettlebell How Heavy To Start

This article will provide you with all the information you need to pick the correct kettle bell weight and perform exercises with proper form. And to make things easier for you, we have included a simple 15-minute kettle bell workout video to get you in the best shape of your life.

author
Carole Stephens
• Tuesday, 13 October, 2020
• 16 min read
kettlebell weight should primal starting
(Source: www.ericleija.com)

There are a few problems with picking a kettle bell weight depending on your training experience. I need you to throw away your current perception of weight training, and look at the kettle bell as something new and different.

While you may not think you need to, having at least one session with a trained kettle bell professional will make an enormous difference in your results. You’ll be using multiple muscle groups at the same time through ballistic, full-body movements.

A kettle bell professional can show you the basics; like, the Clean, Swing, Goblet Squat, Windmill, and Turkish Get Up. When performed properly, kettle bell movements will improve your body control, shorten your workout time, and give you functional results (and physique).

The core movements in kettle bell training have exploded into hundreds of new exercises and techniques. Assuming you’ve been to at least one session with a kettle bell professional and are ready to get started, here is what I recommend based on gender.

A new female kettle bell trainee might pick up the weight, and automatically try to perform a 1- arm upright row (without one thought of lifting technique, mind you), and immediately exclaim, “I can’t lift that!” When done properly, kettle bell movements will improve your body control, shorten your workout time, and give you functional results (and physique) unlike anything you’ve been able to achieve in the past.

kettlebell heavy swing fallacy perform
(Source: perform-360.com)

A big mistake is selecting a weight that is too light (again, assuming that you have trained with a kettle bell professional). If you do this, you will never perfect your form, you will never progress to heavier weights, and you will not achieve the real benefits that kettle bells have to offer.

Unlike women, most men will look at the 16-kg kettle bell starting weight and say, “That’s way too light! Areas of your core (back, abdominal, and upper legs) will be on fire during your first session.

To maintain proper form, you need a weight that is in proportion to your skill level, which may be low initially. Men who have never used a kettle bell are especially susceptible to muscling through a movement, rather than performing it with proper form.

You will hear this term used more in CrossFit boxes and by most traditional kettle bell instructors. Innit Kettle bells are made with a high-quality, chip-resistant coating that’s strong enough to endure your most punishing workouts.

1) A chip-resistant coating, smooth enough for stamina-building work sets without irritating your hands, yet with just enough texture to take gym chalk. Some other aspects of kettle bell design to consider are: grip diameter, grip width, ball diameter, and the distance from the top of the ball to the bottom of the handle.

heavy kettlebells training extremely tips start academy onnit strength
(Source: www.onnit.com)

This workout will make you so beefy, Hollywood would be crazy not to cast you in the next Marvel movie! Whether you’re a trainer or fitness enthusiast the kettle bell should have a place in your training for the results it can deliver in less time.

Whether you decide to use your kettle bell to supplement your training or as a stand-alone tool you will gather the exact system on how to do so. The benefits of the kettle bell are immense and with this single tool one can create incredible strength, power output, and stamina if used to its potential.

At the Innit Academy we believe the kettle bell can create powerful athletes regardless of your chosen sport and with this system you will have everything they need to do just that. At the Innit Academy we believe the kettle bell can create powerful athletes regardless of your chosen sport and with this system you will have everything they need to do just that.

Here are some tips to start thinking about what kettle bell weight to choose. To skip the tips and jump straight to the guide, click here.

Lose weight / fat loss Gain overall strength Become flexible Increase cardiovascular endurance Etc. Performing a racked squat with a kettle bell is completely different from a ballistic swing, or overhead reverse lunge.

kettlebell heavy swing
(Source: www.youtube.com)

If you can handle a 24 kg swing, that doesn’t mean it’s the right weight to use for high volume or endurance. If you’re mainly going to be doing slow lifts and carries like, dead lifts, farmer walks, racked walks, goblet squats, racked squats, and even some double arm chest presses etc.

If you want to work on endurance or cardio, you’ll be doing a higher volume, if you want to work on strength, hypertrophy, then you’ll be doing lower volume. I’ll post a link below where you can see 90+ kettle bell exercises in action.

If so, it will be easier to understand some concepts in kettle bell training, hence, you’ll be safer, so you can increase the weight you choose. Following is a guide on what kettle bell weight to choose, however, you should consider all the points above first and make your own informed decision.

Taco Fleur Russian Gregory Sport Institute Kettle bell Coach, Caveman training Certified, IFF Certified Kettle bell Teacher, Kettle bell Sport Rank 2, HardstyleFit Kettle bell Level 1 Instructor., CrossFit Level 1 Trainer, CrossFit Judges Certificate, CrossFit Lesson Planning Certificate, Kettle bells Level 2 Trainer, Kettle bell Science and Application, MMA Fitness Level 2, MMA Conditioning Level 1, BJJ Purple Belt and more. Owner of Caveman training and Kettle bell Training Education.

Herman Corner, another strength legend and a giant for his day, weighing in at a whopping 315, used to perform one-handed flips with a 171 pound kettle bell. Modern day Canadian strongman John Heidi exceeded this by flip-catching a 180 pound kettle bell with one hand.

kettlebell training benefits heavy health
(Source: www.atomhealthandfitness.co.uk)

Making the deed even more difficult was the considerably thicker handle than the one on Corner’s kettle bell. Heidi also routinely double flips 100+ pound kettle bells with one hand.

Even the late great World’s Strongest Man Competitor Jesse Marine trained with heavy kettle bells. Heavy kettle bells test our grip and give the lifter whole-body strength.

They make us pull, push and twist with everything we have, lighting our nervous systems up like a fireworks display. Whether your goal is to hoist a limit lift, add repetitions to a low rep set, or to confidently attempt a new feat of strength, you too can get in the game with heavy 100+ pound kettle bells.

There are four main ways to progress with heavy kettle bells they include gradually increasing your working weight, adding repetitions to your work sets, gradually working up to harder variations of the same exercise (i.e. progress from the jerk to the press), and gradually working up to more difficult exercises with the same weight (i.e. progress from the high-pull to the two-handed swing, then to the one-handed swing, and finally the snatch). Obviously, one method to increase your working-weight is to gradually work your way into using progressively heavier kettle bells.

At least once per week perform a handful of singles, doubles, and triples in key movements such as the clean, snatch, jerk, or bent press, using the next heavier weight. One downside with this method is that most kettle bell sets increase in increments of greater than five pounds.

snatch heavy kettlebells kettlebell comment leave
(Source: legendarystrength.com)

You need to work up to ten snatches or more to safely move up thirty pounds. This is probably my least favorite method, at this point you are losing the feel of the weight and will have a difficult time adjusting to performing singles again.

The third method of increasing your kettle bell poundage is to gradually progress from different variations of the same exercise. The last method for progressing with heavy kettle bells is one that I employed to clean and press the famous “Baby”.

We created the “Baby” because the heaviest kettle bell my training partners and I could find was only 72 pounds. The problem was jumping to the 145 was too great, regardless of the number of repetitions I could perform for any lift with the 65.

My back and legs were getting strong, but my grip still lacked the strength to complete the one-handed clean. I could clean the weight to my shoulder with two hands and an alternating grip at this point, but I felt it changed the movement so much that I decided against using it regularly.

My grip was coming along nicely, so I after a couple of months I dared to attempt a one-handed clean. After a few more workouts, I was successful in completing a full clean and press with the Baby.

(Source: www.pinterest.com)

Ultimately, I was able to execute this feat with greater weight for multiple repetition sets. The point of this article is simply to get you, the reader, to step outside your comfort zone and try weights that you previously avoided either because you thought they were too heavy or because you did not recognize the benefit.

Depending upon your goal, there is nothing wrong with performing high repetition snatches with a light weight or going through a fast circuit. So the next time you can train with a slightly heavier kettle bell or if you decide that you want to go all out and push a limit lift, go for it.

Quarantine mandates set off an unprecedented run on home fitness equipment that left manufacturers struggling to keep up with demand. It seems the rest of the world is catching on to what us fitness nerds have known all along — a good set of kettle bells at home is worth its weight in gold, or at least a monthly gym membership.

If you’ve been thinking about starting or upgrading your home gym (whether that’s a corner of your bedroom, or a full two-car garage), this article will tell you exactly what you need to know about kettle bells, how many to get, where to buy them, and how to put them to good use. The design of the kettle offers three distinct advantages over it’s “bell” brothers, the dumbbell and barbell:

They sit flat on the floor (no rolling around) and the compact design means no wasted space. Likewise, dumbbells are a great training tool, but you’ll need a lot of them to get a decent full-body workout.

kettlebells kettlebell start
(Source: extrafatkiller.blogspot.com)

Armed with some savvy training knowledge (you will be by the end of this article), you’ll be able to get a great total-body workout with only 1-3 kettle bells, no matter your strength level. As a fitness coach, my goal is to get new clients feeling comfortable and confident while lifting weights and learning basic movement patterns.

Because the bell’s center of mass is directly under your grip, dead lifts fly up naturally without much cueing. But no matter your goal, or where you’re starting from, kettle bell training can transform your body and performance in ways you never thought possible.

Losing body fat and maintaining a lean physique comes down to controlling calories through nutrition and training. Kettle bell training offers many powerful ways to rev your metabolism and burn a mountain of calories in very little time.

The kettle bell swing is a hip hinge dominant movement, like a dead lift or box jump. This means each and every rep engages the posterior chain muscles of the hamstrings, glutes, back, and lats (plus lots of cores if you do them right).

When working all these large muscle groups dynamically at the same time, your heart rate jumps and you enjoy a calorie burn akin to a sprint (without the impact on the joints). Of course, any exercise can help you lose weight, but the kettle bell swing (and its big brother — the snatch) is a one-stop-shop for anyone looking for a simple and proven approach to cut body fat while building functional strength.

kettlebell heavy swing
(Source: www.youtube.com)

As mentioned above, kettle bells are a great way for beginners to learn the fine art of strength training. The foundational kettle bell lifts cover all the major movement patterns while developing athleticism and a strong mind-muscle connection.

Squats and swings build powerful and mobile hips — the keystone for every truly strong athlete. Row and press variations (especially bottoms-up) build resilient shoulders and a guaranteed ticket to the gun show.

This “what the hell” effect takes place when, after using kettle bells for a while, new reserves of strength and skill suddenly appear to demolish stubborn old personal records. For example, a long-distance trail runner might flounder after a couple laps in the pool… and a swimmer might find cycling tortuous.

Kettle bell training is optimal for a type of endurance called general physical preparedness (GPP). You won’t be the absolute best in any one field, but you’ll be in great shape and ready to handle a broad range of activities — from pickup basketball to packing a U-Haul.

Over the years, I’ve invested in nearly 30 kettle bells (a hodgepodge of different sizes, styles, and brands). Plus, a medium weight is ideal for kettle bell complexes — the stringing together of multiple lifts into a larger continuous set.

workout training kettlebell crossfit weight female workouts athlete woman loss dumbbell lifting working exercises tabata fat exercise killer kettle bell
(Source: onnit.com)

Kettles come much heavier than these (the 48 kg “Beast” is the cherry on top most collections), but we’re focusing on the sizes with the most value for beginners. Without the option of increasing weight in small steps, you are forced to make progress in various other ways with the same bell — volume (more reps), density (less rest), and variations (there are dozens of ways to perform a lift) are the big ones.

No matter your sex or fitness level, nearly every bell size has great value and there’s plenty of overlap in the recommendations anyway. These are your “bread ‘n butter” weights that will serve you well in both lower and upper body training for life.

Finally, the extra 12 kg will give you a great pair for double kettle bell workouts. We follow the same line of reasoning for the fellas, with an assumption of more general upper body strength.

We start with 12 kg as even the brawniest of dudes will get good use from one for mobility-oriented lifts like arm bars and windmills as well as advanced get-up and bottoms-up press work. From here, I like to recommend a pair of 20 kg (44 lb) kettle bells as this seems to be a sweet spot for double bell complexes.

The good news is there are plenty of trusted online sellers that offer quality kettle bells. Here’s my top-5 list of recommended kettle bell brands and merchants based on my own personal use (all links are affiliate):

kettlebell weight start academy fat starting tips body again kg
(Source: www.onnit.com)

Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell but injured my back due to stupidity in technique, so I gave it a go again last month with a lighter weight and went with an 8 kg. I have experienced some weight loss with the garbage around my waist starting to fade but I have not gained any muscle.

I can still see my rib cage and my neck looks like what you see on Bill Clinton and Al Sharpton. I believe I am ready to move on now to a higher weight as the 8 kg feels at times like swinging a doll but am I looking for one that would help both with cardio and boosting muscle growth.

The 24 kg and 32 kg seem more of a preferred choice among those who have experienced solid gains and developed transformations but I'm not sure if that is too big a leap. Basically, I'd like to hear about your individual experiences on what weight(s) you have used to notice a growth in your physique.

This is quite helpful and yes, I am also limited financially, so I am looking for a weight which I will not outgrow fairly quickly. Generally how long do users incorporate 24 kg before finding it to light?

Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably? I am able to work the 40 kg on some moves (swings, goblets & TGU) but still use the 24 a lot.

kettlebell weight workouts beginners woman should female related
(Source: www.simplefitnesshub.com)

I am able to work the 40 kg on some moves (swings, goblets & TGU) but still use the 24 a lot. Level 9 Valued Member Master Certified Instructor

Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell but injured my back due to stupidity in technique, so I gave it a go again last month with a lighter weight and went with an 8 kg. I have experienced some weight loss with the garbage around my waist starting to fade but I have not gained any muscle.

I can still see my rib cage and my neck looks like what you see on Bill Clinton and Al Sharpton. I believe I am ready to move on now to a higher weight as the 8 kg feels at times like swinging a doll but am I looking for one that would help both with cardio and boosting muscle growth.

The 24 kg and 32 kg seem more of a preferred choice among those who have experienced solid gains and developed transformations but I'm not sure if that is too big a leap. Basically, I'd like to hear about your individual experiences on what weight(s) you have used to notice a growth in your physique.

I will suggest an alternative approach:#1 technique first — simultaneously, focus on better food and more rest #2 then build strength #3 and then focus on hypertrophy (hint — if you follow #1 and #2, you will most likely hit #3 goal without even trying) Hard to suggest weight — we don't know what is your technique, current strength level, what exercises do you use, etc.

kettlebell heavy training starting benefits workout
(Source: www.healthxperts.net)

Basically you could still progress with it... Do dead lifts, 2 arm swings, progress to one arm swings, practice cleans, try to press it with leg drive until you can strict press it. This is quite helpful and yes, I am also limited financially, so I am looking for a weight which I will not outgrow fairly quickly.

Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably? “Beginner” has a very wide range of physical starting states, even if all people are equally new to kettle bells.

swing, welcome to Strongest Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell ... I believe I am ready to move on now to a higher weight as the 8 kg feels at times like swinging a doll but am I looking for one that would help both with cardio and boosting muscle growth.

In the meantime buy a 24 kg to get ready for the next progression. Are you following any particular program like Simple & Sinister? Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably?

I am able to work the 40 kg on some moves (swings, goblets & TGU) but still use the 24 a lot. Obviously the selection of lifts should be thought through carefully (to avoid trauma) and training has to be planned.

reasons training brainer kettlebell start why need created august
(Source: www.kettlercise.com)

I started my Strongest journey with the purchase of a 24 and a Kindle copy of Simple&Sinister. “Beginner” has a very wide range of physical starting states, even if all people are equally new to kettle bells.

It describes how to progress. As to brand, I think most are likely OK for 2 hand swings, but I can say for sure that Rogue is good. I purchased a used copy of Simple & Sinister from Casebooks and hope to receive it by early next week.

Unfortunately I no longer have the 16 kg kettle bell as I returned it shortly after injuring my back. I would consider buying another 16 kg but would prefer a weight that would stay challenging for a while and help with building muscle.

When the book arrives, I will start incorporating the exercises in the program with the 8 kg to get a feel but plan on going forward with a heavier weight. Besides Rogue and Kettle bell Kings, are there any other brands that offer wide handles?

Do any of you have any experiences with the Pavel Brand kettle bells that are sold on the Strongest online store? I do not think it is a mistake to invest in a small collection of Kettle bells from 8,16,24,32 at least (I have more), but the 32 gave me what the 24 never could, but I would not be there without the 16 and the 24.

kettlebell heavy
(Source: www.youtube.com)

I do not think it is a mistake to invest in a small collection of Kettle bells from 8,16,24,32 at least (I have more), but the 32 gave me what the 24 never could, but I would not be there without the 16 and the 24. For hypertrophy, you need a heavier KB than whatever you're comfortably doing volume with now (progressive overload).

Set Simple as your objective goal & let the The come with it (Help Me Screw Things Up). My wife yelled at me when the FedEx guy was struggling up the driveway with double 32s.....

To add to the already good suggestions above, if you only want to do swing, and you really only can afford one kettle bell, the 24 should probably be your go-to bell for now. 16 will be outgrown very fast in most cases for men, unless you have existing medical conditions or are of very small build.

If you then cannot add more kettle bells, you can do the progression: dead lifts (to practice hinging, bracing, ..., you will get the drills in SAS), 2 hands swings, 1 hand swings, snatch (you may or may not need a lighter kettle bell to learn the snatch though). If you also want to do other moves that involve arm and shoulder muscles (TGU, press, ...), you will probably also need at least the 16, unless you are already quite strong.

A kettle bell is of no benefit unless it is an appropriate weight for your level of strength and technique, for the drills you are using it for, and for your goals and programming. Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably?

kettlebell goblet squat exercises lean tips squats 80kg stay during summer swings intense swing catch king ups workouts strength
(Source: www.youtube.com)

I own and have used a selection of DragonDoor, Rogue, and Perform Better cast iron bells, and competition bells from Kettle bell Kings and Kettle bells USA (as well as briefly handling a number of other brands). They may be usable for two-arm swings, but none of them are comfortable. And I think chasing big bells for two arm swings is not an economic strategy, and not necessary to any training goals.

For overloading swings specifically, a T-handle (manufactured or DIY) is much more economical (and comfortable). New York Barbell has these TDS wide handle kettle bells for sale.

I haven't used one, so I can't speak to their fit and finish but the handles look wider than normal in the picture. The question I would be asking myself is... “have I corrected my form issues?” You said you screwed your back up with a 16 kg and poor technique so you bought a 8k.

You can get away with it with light weight but moving up to a 24 kg is just asking for more trouble if your form isn’t spot on.

Related Videos

Sources
1 www.onnit.com - https://www.onnit.com/academy/what-is-the-best-kettlebell-weight-to-start-with/
2 www.cavemantraining.com - https://www.cavemantraining.com/caveman-kettlebells/weight-kettlebell/
3 www.onnit.com - https://www.onnit.com/academy/top-4-tips-to-start-training-with-extremely-heavy-kettlebells/
4 zackhenderson.com - https://zackhenderson.com/kettlebell-sizes-to-start-with/
5 www.strongfirst.com - https://www.strongfirst.com/community/threads/how-heavy-a-kettlebell-to-build-muscle.14714/