logo
About    |    Archive

Kettlebell For Vertical Jump

One of my previous jobs was helping a group of very talented beach volleyball players get stronger and faster. With lots of explosive overhead work it’s quite common for volleyball players to experience various degrees of shoulder problems.

author
Paul Gonzalez
• Friday, 13 November, 2020
• 8 min read
volleyball jump vertical improve jumps kettlebell funny workouts players increase swings using training basketball started workout around long kettlebells
(Source: functionalalexch.blogspot.com)

The solution to that was really quite simple — many of them weren’t doing any actual strength work so adding in anything helped tremendously. But that still left one big issue to overcome — anyone who has played volleyball will tell you that their vertical jump is always on their mind.

One of the biggest issues I had was that I had a bunch of really fast, explosive athletes in front of me, but they would literally hurt themselves getting out of bed. Typical volleyball training involves various plyometric work, such as rebound jumps and hitting and blocking drills.

But when your guys are getting hurt getting out of bed in the morning you should probably think hard before you add in more work that may see them getting injured in training. It had nothing to do with the sprint training either, as we spent more time working on landing skills and teaching body mechanics for all the various ways you need to move on court safely.

I think the reason for this is simple — it’s incredibly well detailed and broken down so that it is repeatable and provides a safe way to perform the movement. Pavel’s brilliance in this field has been recognized now and when scientists like Dr. Stuart McGill are using him as their reference guide for kettle bells the rest of the world is following suit.

On the contrary, Lake and Lauder have found the demands of the swing can actually exceed commonly used lower body exercises designed for these purposes. The trainees weren’t complete novices, although were only given six tune up sessions to learn the swing prior to study, so they were about as green as could be without being totally foreign to using kettle bells.

leap vertical increase
(Source: www.skillofstrength.com)

Being honest three months training isn’t much and you could reasonably expect that nearly any program would give you a result at that level of preparation. Following the six-week, twice weekly training subjects experienced an increase of roughly ten percent (9.8%) in maximum strength.

It limits the amount of landings an athlete needs to undergo, helping to prevent injury or even allowing them to recover between on court sessions, teaches the same mechanics as the jump and drills it until it becomes second nature, and is performed at a high enough speed to actually have some carryover unlike most traditional gym based movements. Olympic lifting and plyometric exercises are important for building speed, strength and power.

The Kettle bell Swing is a good alternative because it enhances vertical jump power and continues your training routine without excessive impact on the patellar or Achilles tendons. The Kettle bell Swing is performed explosively, much like jumping, with force generation coming directly from the glutes, low back and hamstrings as well as the stretch shortening cycle (SSC).

During the Kettle bell Swing, athletes stay rooted to the ground and minimize the eccentric loading on tendons, sparing them from pain and injury. For vertical jump training, choose a weight you can swing explosively for about 5 reps. Too often, people use kettle bells that are more appropriate for conditioning/muscular endurance than power development.

It also pulls the weight down faster, forcing you to control the speed and training your lower back muscles and hamstrings. Olympic lifting and plyometric exercises are important for building speed, strength and power.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

The Kettle bell Swing is a good alternative because it enhances vertical jump power and continues your training routine without excessive impact on the patellar or Achilles tendons. However, the benefit of kettle bell training that really caught my eye was their ability to help increase your vertical jump.

I suspect most people reading this article will be also interested in this use, so I will focus on the areas that apply to this goal. For the purpose of improving an athletes vertical jump there are two major uses of kettle bell training that spring to mind.

The beauty of the kettle bell swing for improving your vertical jump is the way these two movements closely mimic each other. Unlike traditional weight training, and even Olympic lifting to a certain extent, there is very little deceleration at the end of each swing.

This means that just like maximum effort jumping, you can focus on utilizing full power through the whole range of the rep. Another great benefit of doing swings is how they develop eccentric and reversal strength by loading and unloading the glutes and hamstrings in a dynamic fashion.

For both a kettle bell swing and a vertical jump, you are required to quickly ‘catch' a weight at the bottom to reverse the direction. In both instances you need to apply eccentric strength to stop the downward motion before reversing back into the actual upwards movement.

plyometric box jump exercise kettlebell exercises workout athlete plyometrics benefits jumping plyo jumps shred vertical increase training series physical gym
(Source: kettlebellcentral.com)

This similarity in movement pattern helps make the kettle bell swing an extremely effective exercise for developing explosive power in a manner that transfers nicely to improved jump height. 4) Straighten up by snapping your hips into the extended position causing the kettle bell to swing up as fast and as high as you can.

The key thing to remember when performing swings is that it is the snapping motion of the hips that drives the bell upwards, not the lower back. If you watch the videos you will notice how Mark's hips snap into extension slightly before the kettle bell comes past on its upward journey.

As mentioned part of what makes the swing such an excellent vertical jumping exercise is the lack of deceleration. On this site there are plenty of articles discussing the best ways to help you increase your explosive strength and power, but this is only half the jumping equation.

For jumpers and other explosive athletes I mostly recommend diet as the key tool for fat loss. The reason for this is that most forms of cardio will help you decrease body fat, but they also tend to negatively impact your ability to become fast, strong, or jump high.

When wanting to maximize fat loss I am a firm believer in an escalating density training (EDT) type approach. For EDT, you simply go out and perform a movement with a certain weight for a certain time (e.g. 10 to 15 minutes) and record the number of reps you did.

swings advanced
(Source: www.youtube.com)

As you continue to beat your previous number of reps you are doing more work in the same amount of time, hence the escalation of density. The high speed nature of the swing fires up the CNS and the muscles of the posterior chain.

WARNING: THE VERTICALJUMP TRAINING TECHNIQUES DESCRIBED IN GAME CHANGERS ARE EXTREMELY POWERFUL. I am in no doubt that after a few weeks of heavy swings you will start to notice quite a difference in your explosiveness and of course, your vertical jump.

This Kettle bell Workout is designed to maximize the amount of fat you can burn and increase your vertical jump as much as possible. Even if you have no intentions of jumping higher, these will be very fun workouts that will help you increase your metabolism and tone your arms, legs, and all over.

You only need a Lutterell to do these kettle bell workouts, making them surprisingly convenient and affordable (if you need to buy one) Both of these exercises not only train the calves, hamstrings, quadriceps, and glutes to generate a ton of power, but also burn an enormous amount of calories since they take so much effort to do.

If you attempted the workout, I hope you had a great time and got the results you wanted. I started strength training about a year ago, with a primary goal of increasing my vertical leap and explosiveness for basketball.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

I started at very low weight, but have since hit ~200lbs on a 5×5 and added a few inches to my leap. Now, I'm moving and have to give up my home gym setup, or the squat rack at least. I do have access to a proper gym through my employer (a university), but it's more inconvenient in location and in crowding.

I should note I am aware of this thread on the vertical jump, but I'd like to get thoughts on training primarily with kettle bells instead of simply adding them to a routine. Vert Shock (google it) gives you results without needing any equipment.

Since it's using plyometrics, it's nice to have excess to ply boxes, but you don't need them. Kettle bells can assist in a jump routine, because of the explosive nature of e.g. the swing.

I can see especially shadow swings or other forms of overspend eccentrics*** as a valuable tool. You need specific programming to increase your vertical and while KB scan certainly be a part of it, a KB only approach won't get you very far.

Snatches will also help with “aspiring to elevate”. A rack-less bar can be used for dead lift and teacher squats. I would encourage (Kb or BB) cleans and snatches (> swings) as the line of pull is closer to vertical, and for some they are easier on the back.

(Source: www.verticaljumpingprograms.com)

One cue for a power clean is to get the bar to a certain height, maintain upper body tension/straight arms and basically jump it up. Hello, burg Clean & Jerk can be a nice supplement because they work both leg and arm explosiveness.

Hello, burg In case you'd want so technical details about these moves: I gained some air underneath me with the bent press, just because it made my thoracic spine and shoulder girdle more mobile (my left shoulder used to stick at some point).

Sure more is better, but ounces of skill, anticipation, court vision/awareness, and competitive spirit are worth pounds of athletic ability. In most cases, time spent on the court learning, refining and practicing basketball skills is worth more than time spent in the gym on physical training (although the two are complementary).

Dipping under the weight serves no purpose for basketball and is arguably counterproductive. Being able to power the bells overhead with a quick, shallow and explosive dip and leg drive is better than using heavier weights that you can't move as fast and have to press out more.

--All variations of dead lifts are great for being able to root and hold position without having to lean into other players and get off balance. With the ball in your hand you can get of your shot against a more athletic player with a bigger leap, just for the simple fact that you move first.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

He has to react to your shot and most of the time the ball already left your hand when he catches up in the air. Steve already said it, experience and anticipating movement is much more important than pure athletic ability. The real question is, do you need the bigger leap or do you just want it?

burg As a life-long basketball player (and known as an explosive leaper into my early forties, although not so much the last decade), here are some of my thoughts:---Hinge pattern ballistics like swings and snatches have their place, but IMO basketball players benefit more from squat pattern drills. Dipping under the weight serves no purpose for basketball and is arguably counterproductive.

Being able to power the bells overhead with a quick, shallow and explosive dip and leg drive is better than using heavier weights that you can't move as fast and have to press out more. --All variations of dead lifts are great for being able to root and hold position without having to lean into other players and get off balance.

If we were training for pure vertical leap, the front squat seems like it is more mechanically similar. Bret Contreras recently found that the front squat was better than a hip thrust in improving vertical leap.

Fabio Zoning and colleagues in Italy tested ballet dancers and found that swings improved their leaps. The thing with basketball is that you are often jumping in traffic (like jumping in a phone booth -- if anyone remembers phone booths) where you don't have space for a deep hip hinge or much arm swing.

dailymail jump
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

I think the double KB push press (light and explosive as I described above) has great carryover to jumping in tight spaces. Double front squat has great carryover to the defensive stance. Swings and snatches are great general preparation for explosive hip and knee extension.

Related Videos

Sources
1 breakingmuscle.com - https://breakingmuscle.com/fitness/using-kettlebell-swings-to-improve-vertical-jump
2 www.stack.com - https://www.stack.com/a/3-kettlebell-exercises-to-improve-your-vertical-jump
3 www.verticaljumping.com - https://www.verticaljumping.com/kettlebell_training.html
4 kettlebellcentral.com - http://kettlebellcentral.com/kettlebell-workout-shred-fat-increase-vertical-jump/
5 www.strongfirst.com - https://www.strongfirst.com/community/threads/transitioning-to-kettlebells-for-vertical-leap-training.9219/