logo
About    |    Archive

Kettlebell For Pull Ups

When I take a look back at all the programs I’ve written for clients and performed myself, there are two exercises that consistently provide the best results.

author
Maria Johnson
• Thursday, 22 October, 2020
• 8 min read
kettlebell exercises workouts pull fitness workout standing chest routines legs nikki training fat squat benefits calories pushups burned pulling womens
(Source: www.womenshealthandfitness.com.au)

I wanted to take just these two super effective exercises and create an 8-week training program. By using variations of these two exercises, I developed a very simple, but NOT easy training program that yields great strength gains.

This is a great strength training program to start now as we head into the busy holiday season. Instead, keep it simple, not easy, while getting stronger, with Essential Strength, an 8-week kettle bell swing and pull -up program.

Prerequisite: You must be able to perform five strict dead hang pull — ups ! If you’re a strength training addict who thrives on new ways to challenge the body, kettle bell couplet workouts are a great option for testing your limits and spicing things up.

We recently stopped by to visit Mike Steele of Training Room Online in Avon and Point Pleasant Beach, N.J., for a fresh routine that he uses to get his clients and athletes the brute strength they desire. (Click the links for Steele’s visual guides to these exercises.)

Double Kettle bell Overhead Walk, 30 seconds I'm curious how much carry over they have, I suppose along with active hangs, negatives, hollow body holds, etc...

kettlebell weighted exercises pullup pullups
(Source: www.muscleandfitness.com)

I do absolutely zero pull ups on a regular basis but always include rows in my planning. I may not be typical, but I feel they have pretty good carry-over as long as you finish off each row — fully chamber the arm at the top of the lift.

I do absolutely zero pull ups on a regular basis but always include rows in my planning. I can fairly reliably hit 10-12 chins, a few more with a neutral grip. I may not be typical, but I feel they have pretty good carry-over as long as you finish off each row — fully chamber the arm at the top of the lift.

This may work both ways, I do pull ups/chin ups mostly but don't have a problem doing renegades, for instance, with 32k for reps using strict form. Not to go off my own topic, but the heaviest I've ever snatched is 24 kg and the drop lacks a certain amount of finest and I don't “catch” it well with the hip hinge.

Maintaining the hook grip without the kettle bell flying out I think is the reason for the drop issue. Not to go off my own topic, but the heaviest I've ever snatched is 24 kg and the drop lacks a certain amount of finest and I don't “catch” it well with the hip hinge.

Maintaining the hook grip without the kettle bell flying out I think is the reason for the drop issue. I am currently working on taming the arc better that what is shown here, by “pulling” with the arm at the same time as the hip snap (Al's advice) on the upswing, not right after, as I'm doing here.

crossfit pull kettlebells training exercise
(Source: www.dreamstime.com)

Seeing the slow motion snatch really highlights what is essentially an isometric row during the upswing when the bell is waist-head level. There's probably some threshold of snatch weight relative to body weight that you need to hit before you get the carryover.

A video from last week, in case it helps (slo-mo video is sometimes very instructional)... I am currently working on taming the arc better that what is shown here, by “pulling” with the arm at the same time as the hip snap (Al's advice) on the upswing, not right after, as I'm doing here. Based on looking at when you start allowing your arm to straighten, I've been waiting a bit too long.

The back swing ends up feeling more vertical instead of landing in a deep hinge. In my case I agree with this 100%. To me, the row/pull up both use a fair amount of scapular action that the snatch does not really employ.

To be fair the path of cap movement is not the same for row or pull up, but they do both seem to finish in the same spot. When I'm snatching I'm trying to keep the shoulder socket connected as snug as possible throughout, with hinge and leg drive generating all the lifting power — am I trying to prevent as much scapular movement as I can.

The last bit of snug at the top of the snatch is the opposite of where the slack draws out with a pull up or row. In my case I agree with this 100%. To me, the row/pull up both use a fair amount of scapular action that the snatch does not really employ.

kettlebell pull ups med oevningar januari
(Source: fitnessfia.com)

To be fair the path of cap movement is not the same for row or pull up, but they do both seem to finish in the same spot. When I'm snatching I'm trying to keep the shoulder socket connected as snug as possible throughout, with hinge and leg drive generating all the lifting power — am I trying to prevent as much scapular movement as I can.

The last bit of snug at the top of the snatch is the opposite of where the slack draws out with a pull up or row. Not many lifts really need this continuous attention to keeping the shoulder tight in its socket throughout, and you can really feel a difference when performed this way — though you cannot readily see it when demonstrated. I suppose once it goes below horizontal, this type of tension will aid in low pulling movements in the way that above horizontal tension will help with high pulling movements.

I've noticed doing sandbag shoulder cleans from the floor that this sort of tension is important there as well, where the hinge is somewhat dynamic (depending on the load) but the upper movement is more of a grind from low pull to hands above horizontal/elbows up transforming to high pull. Sandbag power cleans, while similar, only actively need the tension right at the bottom as the load is cinched up and then becomes ballistic.

Yes, very important to do the renegades with very high tension and full ROM, when I'm doing them I barely feel the weight as tension is so high, and most of my concentration is on the down hand as I press it through the floor while crushing handles. It's one of my favorite exercises, it forces high tension without a break while also being great practice for breathing behind the shield. However, I notice that by doing heavy kettle bell swings, my grip/ forearm strength increased which led to improving my pull ups.

But for some weighted moves, especially ones that require an explosive movement, kettle bells reign supreme. You can also hold them by the handle or the bell (the round part of the weight), which allows you to get a different range of motion depending on the kettle bell exercise you're doing.

(Source: cuddleyourdogs.com)

Plus, the shape of a kettle bell lets you work your muscles a little differently than a traditional dumbbell, Jessica Sims, a NASM-certified personal trainer at the Hitting Room in New York City, tells SELF. When you take a class with kettle bells, or any other new type of equipment, it's normal to feel a little lost.

Oh, and a quick lesson on the lingo: The “ball” refers to the heavy sphere at the bottom, and the handle is the part attached to it. The handle is also referred to as the “horns,” and can be gripped at the top, on the sides, or near the base where it meets the ball.

Adding a kettle bell increases the resistance your body has to work against to stand back up, challenging your muscles even more. In addition, holding the kettle bell close to your chest helps you nail proper form.

“When you pick up heavy grocery bags, you should squat down like this so you don't hurt your back.” Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, toes turned out slightly, gripping the sides of the kettle bell handle with both hands at chest height.

They also secretly challenge your core, since you have to keep your abs tight to avoid arching your back. Sims says to choose a heavier weight with a dead lift—since you're not bending your elbows at all, you're mostly using your glutes, which are likely the strongest muscles in your body.

pull kettlebell sumo exercises exercise enlarge
(Source: www.bodybuilding.com)

Hinge at your hips and push your butt back as you lower your torso and the weight toward the ground. Keeping your core tight, push through your heels to stand up straight.

“Make sure that you don’t let the kettle bells swing, keep them stable by your side like actual suitcases,” Sims says. Push through your heels, putting most of the weight on the back foot, to return to the starting position.

Adding weight to a sit-up adds an extra challenge for your core, and the press at the top works your shoulders and arms, too. For these sit- ups, Sims says you can either keep your knees bent or put them in butterfly position, depending on what feels comfortable for your hips.

Start in a sit-up position, lying on your back with your knees bent and feet on the floor. Kettle bell swings are great for your butt, legs, and lower back, Sims says.

You can probably go heavy here, but she suggests nailing the technique with a lighter kettle bell before adding too much weight. To perform a swing with proper form, you have to “thrust your hips aggressively to get the kettle bell up, don't use your arms,” Sims explains.

weight pull belt bearing belts barbell chin kettlebell chain bodybuilding commercial equipment ups lifting gym fitness
(Source: www.ebay.com)

Bend your knees slightly, then hinge forward at the hips to swing the kettle bell between your legs. Stand back up; use the momentum from your hips to swing the weight to chest height.

Your form here should be similar to a traditional dead lift, except your legs should be wider than shoulder-width distance and your feet should be turned out a bit. Stand with feet wider than shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, and toes angled out.

Keeping your core tight, push through your heels to stand up straight. Switching to one-handed swings isolates one side at a time, which makes it harder and helps improve stability.

Bend your knees slightly, then hinge forward at the hips to swing the kettle bell between your legs. Bend your knees slightly, then hinge forward at the hips to thread the kettle bell between your legs.

Stand back up as you pull the weight from the side of your body to your chest. Bring your now-empty hand to meet the weight at the top of the movement (so you don't slam it into your chest).

pull crossfit kettlebells shutterstock
(Source: www.shutterstock.com)

Grasp a kettle bell in each hand, palms facing out, arms bent so the weights are resting at each shoulder. To protect your lower back and make sure you're using your triceps, don't arch your back, Sims instructs. The key here is to straighten your arm completely at the top—that'll let you work the triceps through a full range of motion.

Grip the kettle bell by the ball at the base of the handle with both hands and raise it directly overhead. Keeping your elbows close to your ears, lower the kettle bell behind your head to neck level.

The trick is to keep your core tight and hold your torso stable as you rotate your arms and the weight. Lift the ball to eye level and slowly circle it around your head to the left.

As the kettle bell goes behind your head, it should be horns up; return to a ball-up position when you finish one revolution. Hold the kettle bell handle in your right hand with your arm hanging straight at your side.

Holding a kettle bell above your head at the top of a crunch challenges your core and lower abs—so does the flutter motion of your legs. Start with the weight above your shoulders, and to make it more difficult, bring it a little behind your head, Sims says.

kettlebell chin barbell pull belt chain lifting gym weight
(Source: www.ebay.com)

Make sure to keep your core super tight and lower back flat on the ground. If your back comes off the ground, or you feel any strain, bring your legs up a couple more inches.

Stand in front of a box or step, holding a kettle bell by the handle with both hands at your chest. Crew Performance Zip-Front Sports Bra (jcrew.com, $45), Cotton On Body Pocket Crop Tight (, $35), and Puma Fierce Evoking Women's Training Shoes (, $120).

Sources
1 www.skillofstrength.com - https://www.skillofstrength.com/essential-strength-kettlebell-swing-and-pull-up-program/
2 www.mensjournal.com - https://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/20-minute-kettlebell-couplet-workout-brute-strength/
3 www.strongfirst.com - https://www.strongfirst.com/community/threads/kettlebell-rows-transfer-to-pull-ups.13822/
4 www.self.com - https://www.self.com/gallery/beginner-kettlebell-moves