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Is A 6kg Kettlebell Heavy Enough

author
Christina Perez
• Friday, 25 December, 2020
• 19 min read

Kettle bell training is a great workout choice for people of all ages and fitness levels. However, the amount of weight you should use is highly variable depending on a myriad of factors.

kettlebell 6kg competition origin ex demo kettlebells display fitness originfitness
(Source: originfitness.com)

Contents

Because women have less muscle mass than men, they have different requirements for their kettle bell weight range. That doesn’t mean that kettle bell training isn’t just as effective for women as it is for men.

The kettle bell weight should a woman use depends on the type of training and the fitness level of the individual. One of the main reasons why most women lift kettle bells is to build lean muscles.

They can be used for strength training, cardio, and flexibility all with just one compact piece of equipment. Additionally, they are highly accessible to people of all ages and ability levels.

Whether you’re just starting or you’re looking to amp up your current workouts, kettle bells can work for you. They are extremely popular because the high intensity workouts give you a lot of exertion in a short amount of time.

Once you learn the proper way to use a kettle bell, you can start working every muscle with just one compact device. Many women fall into the trap of focusing on aerobic exercises and not training your muscles.

kettlebell 6kg competition 16kg 14kg grade 8kg 12kg kettlebells strength active prograde
(Source: train-active.com)

Kettle bells are a great way to condition and tone your body without “beefing up” too much muscle mass. If you try to start with a weight that is too light, you can accidentally isolate your muscles and throw off your entire form.

While 18 lbs might be too challenging for a beginner in other forms of lifting, with kettle bells you will be learning to use both your upper and lower body at the same time. If you start with a weight that is too light you will find it harder to progress in your training since you aren’t learning proper form.

With that said, starting too heavy can also be damaging to your form and increase the risk of injury. However, once you have learned to handle a kettle bell correctly, you will find yourself moving up quickly.

Conversely, a woman who has a strong background in other types of weight training could try starting as high as 25 lbs. The other type is grinds, which tend to isolate certain muscle groups and are done slower to create more tension.

The rule of thumb is to pick heavier weights for ballistics, since they are using a larger number of muscles. Women who are beginning weight training may have different goals than men.

kettlebell 6kg vinyl kettlebells
(Source: uk-fit.com)

A good guideline for when you know you’re ready to move up is when a set of 20 kettle bell swings has become easy and you feel completely confident. The kettle bell weight you lift can help you achieve this goal without having to work too hard.

Also, make sure you include the right amount of reps for each workout and have a proper diet plan. Because form is so important in kettle bell training, make sure you are careful not to pick weights that are too light or too heavy.

However, this can adjust depending on your age, fitness level, and type of workout. Kettle bells are a great and simple way to add weights to your exercise routine.

They are small and easy to grasp, which makes them perfect for intense cardio and heavy lifting. If you’ve been wanting to start training with weights, kettle bells have become extremely popular among fitness fanatics.

You will need to get heavier ones as your routine progresses, but for beginners, 1 kettle bell is enough to complete most workouts. If you’d like to add more endurance to your training, you can hold it with one arm at a time.

(Source: locallyuk.com)

As long as your form is correct, you should be able to get great results with just one kettle bell. Although, if you consider yourself athletic and have acquired much strength, you can start with two kettle bells.

The reason you might see people with a “collection” of kettle bells is that some exercises require different sized weights. Kettle bells are not like dumbbells or barbells which consist of two same-sized weights on each side of your body.

Always remember that these routines should be performed with proper form to get the best outcome. You don’t want to buy one that’s too heavy, this could cause injury to your muscles, especially for a beginner.

You don’t want to buy one that’s too light either, as this can result in little to no muscle building or weight loss. Choosing the right size will depend on a few aspects; your gender and how physically active you are.

Remember when choosing the right size you have to mindful of how many kettle bells you want to use. Whether you have decided yet on how many kettle bells you need, adding them to your workout will help you easily achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

kettlebell weight gym 6kg fitness bell lifting workout 16kg ketle 20kg 24kg
(Source: www.ebay.co.uk)

Unfortunately it’s not so straight forward to answer this question as there are lots of things to consider. However, after reading this post you will be able to decide what size kettle bell is most suitable for your needs.

If you’re reading this guide there is a good chance you’re new to kettle bell training? Well, depending on how regularly you’re planning on working out you’ll need several differently sized kettle bells.

The reason for this is that kettle bell workouts involves a variety of different maneuvers. For example, an upper body workout typically involves swinging the kettle bell overhead.

The chances are that if you have enough strength to swing a kettle bell overhead, it won’t be heavy enough for lower body routines. Kettle bell sizes are usually measured in pounds or kilograms, but sometimes goods.

The next thing you need to consider is the type of kettle bell training you’ll be completing? If you want to work the whole body, you’ll need three different size kettle bells to cover upper, lower and dynamic workouts.

york kettlebell vinyl 6kg 10kg kg sweatband fitness
(Source: www.sweatband.com)

Upper Body : Upper body presses require a lighter size kettle bell as you’re mostly using arm muscles to lift and swing the kettle bell. Mostly these involve dynamic routines which is where the in-between or middle size kettle bell is used.

As part of my FAQ section, I want to help you choose the best weight to start your Kettle bell Training with. Depending on the source you go, to there will be differing opinions on this, so I am recommending these weights based on how I see many beginners cope and with consideration to the type of training I do here.

This is the most vulnerable group, as these individuals need as much focus to be on good form for the exercise, rather than being distracted by the struggle to hold a heavy weight too. I think some beginners put a lot of stress on themselves to be great, especially those who already train.

Strength with Kettle bells takes time to build, and this cannot happen without first understanding what the heck you are doing. Making sure you can perform the exercise effectively before increasing the weight is SO important, which is why I am playing it safe with my recommendations.

When we become arrogant and proud is when we stand to get hurt the most (which doesn’t just apply to Kettle bells). Once you get the hang of the exercises, your confidence will improve and you will feel happier about using that heavy KB.

classic kettlebell 8kg 6kg strength 1rm
(Source: www.1rm.com.au)

So there is no reason to be afraid of weight progression, provided your form is good. Many women often struggle with strength, stability, power and confidence, so these things will be overcome quickly with KB training, provided the correct progressions are made.

I can attest to that personally because I have trained with KB's, in this fashion, for over 2 years now and the only part of me that has become “bigger” is my booty! The high intensity and explosive nature of KB training make it very difficult for you to gain much muscle; instead will get a lot stronger and very well conditioned.

Which translates as “tighter” and “leaner” (provided your diet supports your training goals). This may seem “too safe”, but I have seen many men struggle to complete my workouts with weights they normally find easy.

Men tend to try and progress the weight too rapidly, and they end up not mastering good technique. It just happens that the genders do behave differently around weights, and even more so when there are spectators present.

Many people assume that because they can lift Kg with a Barbell or Dumbbell, that they can go right to the equivalent with a KB. I’d recommend testing your SKILL (not your strength) by choosing one of the lower weights first.

kettlebell strong 6kg spokey hantel sport
(Source: www.sport-shop.pl)

However, women should realistically be using 16 kg regularly as an intermediate and moving on to 20 kg and 24 kg as they advance (depending on the exercise). The advantage of these is that the Bell is fairly compact and can be easily racked by smaller individuals and will not be as likely to get in the way of females’ breasts.

The Competition/Pro Grade Kettle bell (usually more expensive): Made of Hollow Steel, they are all the same size no matter the weight. The advantage of this is that your technique never alters to accommodate a different weight through progression.

Personally I love my Pro-Grades, as they have a very stable base for doing push-ups, renegade rows etc, plus the handles are thinner and smoother than most Standard KB, making grip less of an issue. I recommend sourcing good quality Kettle bells with smooth (single cast are best), rounded handles.

I have bought Kb's from Rogue in the past, but I am not a fan of the handles as they are very thick and rough. Kettle bells, which look like cannonballs with handles, have become a popular strength training alternative to traditional barbells, dumbbells, and resistance machines.

Kettle bell exercises often involve several muscle groups at once, making them a highly effective way to give your arms, legs, and abs a great workout in a short amount of time. Kettle bells can be used for a variety of exercises that improve both your strength and cardiovascular fitness.

classic kettlebell 6kg strength
(Source: www.1rm.com.au)

Russian strongmen in the 1700s developed kettle bells as implements to build strength and endurance. You’ve probably seen depictions of bare-chested carnival strongmen hoisting them over their heads.

Using lighter kettle bells at first allows you to focus on using the proper form and technique for the different exercises. You can always increase the weight once you’re comfortable with the correct form for each exercise.

Fitness experts suggest using kettle bells with the following weights if you’re at an intermediate to advanced level with your strength training: Aim to add more reps each week, then work toward adding more sets as you build strength.

Push your hips backward, and bend your knees to reach the kettle bell handles. Firmly grip the kettle bells, keeping your arms and back straight.

This is an excellent exercise to boost both your muscle strength and cardiovascular fitness. While your shoulders and arms will do a lot of the work, most of the effort should come from the hips and legs.

6kg kettlebell weight ended ad
(Source: www.gumtree.com)

Engage your abdominal muscles and set your shoulders back. Exhale as you make an explosive upward movement to swing the kettle bell out in front of you.

Squats are an excellent lower-body exercise that work your quads, hamstrings, calves, glutes, as well as your abdominal muscles. Stand with your feet a little wider than shoulder-width apart and your toes pointed out slightly.

Using your leg muscles, with your upper body still, straighten up to your starting position. With both hands around the handle, hold the kettle bell close to your chest.

Alternatively, you can hold a kettle bell by the handle in one or both hands, with your arms at your sides. Slowly step forward with your left leg, bending your knee while keeping your right foot in place.

A great exercise for working your abs and obliques (the muscles on the sides of your abdomen that run from your hips to your ribs), the Russian twist can also be done with a weighted medicine ball or barbell plate. When using a kettle bell, be sure to keep a firm grip so that you don’t drop it on your lap.

kettlebell celsius weights 6kg fitness popsugar gym own
(Source: www.popsugar.com.au)

Holding the kettle bell handle with both hands, lean back so that your torso is at about a 45-degree angle to the floor. With your heels a few inches above the floor, rotate your torso from right to left, swinging the kettle bell slightly across your body.

When you’ve completed your repetitions, return to your starting position. When your chest is even with the kettle bell handles, exhale and push your body back up to its starting position.

Hold a kettle bell by the handle so that it rests against the outside part of your shoulder. There are many benefits to working out with kettle bells, for both men and women, across all age groups.

According to a 2019 study, a kettle bell workout is a highly effective way to improve your strength, aerobic power, and overall physical fitness. Compared to resistance circuit-based training, the same study found that a regular kettle bell workout is just as effective at improving cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength.

A 2013 study reported that participants who completed an 8-week kettle bell training session saw noticeable improvements in their aerobic capacity. Kettle bell exercises have the ability to restore muscle mass and improve grip strength in older adults, according to a 2018 study.

(Source: www.kinessonne.com)

According to Harvard Health, kettle bell exercises can also help improve your posture and balance. You typically use your core muscles more with kettle bell exercises than with dumbbells or barbells.

If possible, ask a certified personal trainer at your local gym or fitness center to show you the proper form for kettle bell exercises. Stop immediately if you feel sudden or sharp pain.

A little mild soreness after a workout is normal, but you shouldn’t feel sudden, sharp pain while working out. Kettle bells can take a little getting used to, but working out with them is a highly effective way of improving your muscle strength and cardio fitness.

The key is to start slow and, if possible, with the help of a certified personal trainer. Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell but injured my back due to stupidity in technique, so I gave it a go again last month with a lighter weight and went with an 8 kg.

I have experienced some weight loss with the garbage around my waist starting to fade but I have not gained any muscle. I can still see my rib cage and my neck looks like what you see on Bill Clinton and Al Sharpton.

kettlebell weight 8kg vinyl dkn 6kg kg sweatband
(Source: www.dkn-uk.com)

I believe I am ready to move on now to a higher weight as the 8 kg feels at times like swinging a doll but am I looking for one that would help both with cardio and boosting muscle growth. The 24 kg and 32 kg seem more of a preferred choice among those who have experienced solid gains and developed transformations but I'm not sure if that is too big a leap.

Basically, I'd like to hear about your individual experiences on what weight(s) you have used to notice a growth in your physique. This is quite helpful and yes, I am also limited financially, so I am looking for a weight which I will not outgrow fairly quickly.

Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably? I am able to work the 40 kg on some moves (swings, goblets & TGU) but still use the 24 a lot.

Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell but injured my back due to stupidity in technique, so I gave it a go again last month with a lighter weight and went with an 8 kg. I have experienced some weight loss with the garbage around my waist starting to fade but I have not gained any muscle.

I can still see my rib cage and my neck looks like what you see on Bill Clinton and Al Sharpton. I believe I am ready to move on now to a higher weight as the 8 kg feels at times like swinging a doll but am I looking for one that would help both with cardio and boosting muscle growth.

fitness mad kettlebell 6kg
(Source: www.sweatband.com)

The 24 kg and 32 kg seem more of a preferred choice among those who have experienced solid gains and developed transformations but I'm not sure if that is too big a leap. Basically, I'd like to hear about your individual experiences on what weight(s) you have used to notice a growth in your physique.

Basically you could still progress with it... Do dead lifts, 2 arm swings, progress to one arm swings, practice cleans, try to press it with leg drive until you can strict press it. This is quite helpful and yes, I am also limited financially, so I am looking for a weight which I will not outgrow fairly quickly.

Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably? “Beginner” has a very wide range of physical starting states, even if all people are equally new to kettle bells.

As to brand, I think most are likely OK for 2 hand swings, but I can say for sure that Rogue is good. swing, welcome to Strongest Greetings, last year I started with a 16 kg kettle bell ...

Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably? I am able to work the 40 kg on some moves (swings, goblets & TGU) but still use the 24 a lot.

kettlebell 6kg iron cast
(Source: www.lifespanfitness.com.au)

Obviously the selection of lifts should be thought through carefully (to avoid trauma) and training has to be planned. I started my Strongest journey with the purchase of a 24 and a Kindle copy of Simple&Sinister.

“Beginner” has a very wide range of physical starting states, even if all people are equally new to kettle bells. It describes how to progress. As to brand, I think most are likely OK for 2 hand swings, but I can say for sure that Rogue is good.

I purchased a used copy of Simple & Sinister from Casebooks and hope to receive it by early next week. Best, swing, welcome to Strongest I take it you already own a 16 kg bell and if 8 kg is too light, why not just go with the 16 kg and continue progressing.

Unfortunately I no longer have the 16 kg kettle bell as I returned it shortly after injuring my back. I would consider buying another 16 kg but would prefer a weight that would stay challenging for a while and help with building muscle.

Do any of you have any experiences with the Pavel Brand kettle bells that are sold on the Strongest online store? I do not think it is a mistake to invest in a small collection of Kettle bells from 8,16,24,32 at least (I have more), but the 32 gave me what the 24 never could, but I would not be there without the 16 and the 24.

kettlebell 6kg vinyl
(Source: www.maxxus.com.au)

For hypertrophy, you need a heavier KB than whatever you're comfortably doing volume with now (progressive overload). Set Simple as your objective goal & let the The come with it (Help Me Screw Things Up).

My wife yelled at me when the FedEx guy was struggling up the driveway with double 32s..... To add to the already good suggestions above, if you only want to do swing, and you really only can afford one kettle bell, the 24 should probably be your go-to bell for now.

16 will be outgrown very fast in most cases for men, unless you have existing medical conditions or are of very small build. If you then cannot add more kettle bells, you can do the progression: dead lifts (to practice hinging, bracing, ..., you will get the drills in SAS), 2 hands swings, 1 hand swings, snatch (you may or may not need a lighter kettle bell to learn the snatch though).

If you also want to do other moves that involve arm and shoulder muscles (TGU, press, ...), you will probably also need at least the 16, unless you are already quite strong. A kettle bell is of no benefit unless it is an appropriate weight for your level of strength and technique, for the drills you are using it for, and for your goals and programming.

Do you have a suggestion on which kettle bell brand(s) offer horns wide enough to accommodate two hands comfortably? I own and have used a selection of DragonDoor, Rogue, and Perform Better cast iron bells, and competition bells from Kettle bell Kings and Kettle bells USA (as well as briefly handling a number of other brands). They may be usable for two-arm swings, but none of them are comfortable.

13lb kettlebell 6kg premium
(Source: www.xtrainingequipment.com)

And I think chasing big bells for two arm swings is not an economic strategy, and not necessary to any training goals. For overloading swings specifically, a T-handle (manufactured or DIY) is much more economical (and comfortable).

New York Barbell has these TDS wide handle kettle bells for sale. I haven't used one, so I can't speak to their fit and finish but the handles look wider than normal in the picture.

The question I would be asking myself is... “have I corrected my form issues?” You said you screwed your back up with a 16 kg and poor technique so you bought a 8k. You can get away with it with light weight but moving up to a 24 kg is just asking for more trouble if your form isn’t spot on.

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