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How Much Kettlebell Training Per Week

author
Bob Roberts
• Wednesday, 07 October, 2020
• 6 min read

The better your nutrition and your ability to assimilate your food and drink the quicker you will recover from your previous workout. If you struggle to sleep well and for a good 7 – 9 hours per night then this will affect the speed at which you recover from your workouts.

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Contents

As we age our metabolism slows down and with it our ability to heal from injuries quickly. Asworkoutscause micro-trauma to the muscle fibers the quicker you can heal the more frequently you can exercise per week.

All of these activities may determine how quickly you recovery from your kettle bell workouts. General fitness may include: maintaining muscle mass, challenging your cardio and improving movement skills.

The best way to start is by beginning with a lighter schedule and then adding moreworkoutsif necessary. First it is important to realize that you are going to have to listen to your body and make some adjustments as you navigate your way through your workouts.

If you start feeling overtired or don’t seem to be making any strength, rep or time gains then you are probably exercising too often per week. For most people I recommend starting with the 3 times per week schedule for the first month just to get used to how your body reacts.

Unfortunately the body always needs time to recover from exercise and justworkinghard too will often lead to overtrainingand ultimately niggling injuries. If you have a scheduled rest day but feel like you want to do some form of exercise then try something that doesn’t conflict with your kettle bellworkouts: cycling, walking, rowing, swimming, gardening are all good options.

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Ultimately you need to listen to your body and make adjustments as you go either adding more or lessworkoutsper week. The American Council on Exercise reports that kettlebelltraining can produce twice the benefits in half the time of traditional weightlifting.

Unlikeworkoutswith barbells and dumbbells, kettlebelltraining uses dynamic movements that require stability and core control and combine several muscle groups in one exercise. The variations of kettlebelltraining are effective for full and total-bodyworkoutsthat you can do two to six times a week, but they can also complement any existing cardiovascular or weight-trainingprogram.

Two to threeworkoutsa week allows for more recovery time since soreness can be expected, particularly with each new movement you learn. Kettlebelltraining incorporates movements that many fitness enthusiasts, even avid weightlifters, don't regularly use.

Technically, you can work out with kettle bells daily, especially if you alternate major muscle groups. However, because kettle bells use many big compound movements, such as a clean and push press, that activate several major muscle groups, it's best to schedule at least one but preferably two days off a week for recovery time.

At this level, the kettle bell gets heavier and the combinations become more advanced, such as a roll back to a press. Generally speaking, to improve overall fitness or strength, a serious session 2-3 times a week can work very well.

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Mobility work and active rest between sessions is always a good idea. A: The idea of the kettle bell practice session is a very powerful way to train–especially if you’re really wanting to drill down on the techniques.

The rule of thumb for kettle bell ballisticexercises(swings, cleans, snatches) is to multiply the reps per set by 1.5-2 when compared to grind (presses, squats, dead lifts) to achieve the same effect. A lot of people in this neck of the woods, myself included, are proponents of doing shorter sets (5-10 reps) that preserve maximal power production, and then adjusting the rest periods to get more of a strength/power effect or conditioning effect.

But there are also plenty of people who prefer sport style training, doing sets that last up to 10minutesor so. I hope this helps a little, I know I didn't really give you a solid answer There are some great books out there that explain things better.

My favorites are “Simple and Sinister” and “Enter the Kettle bell,” both by Pavel Tsatsouline and both available on Kindle for pretty cheap. If you are new to kettle bells keep the rep ranges low, moderate sets, and longer rests while learning the movements.

The rule of thumb for kettle bell ballisticexercises(swings, cleans, snatches) is to multiply the reps per set by 1.5-2 when compared to grind (presses, squats, dead lifts) to achieve the same effect. A lot of people in this neck of the woods, myself included, are proponents of doing shorter sets (5-10 reps) that preserve maximal power production, and then adjusting the rest periods to get more of a strength/power effect or conditioning effect.

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(Source: saxonstrengthandconditioning.files.wordpress.com)

But there are also plenty of people who prefer sport style training, doing sets that last up to 10minutesor so. I hope this helps a little, I know I didn't really give you a solid answer There are some great books out there that explain things better.

My favorites are “Simple and Sinister” and “Enter the Kettle bell,” both by Pavel Tsatsouline and both available on Kindle for pretty cheap. If you are new to kettle bells keep the rep ranges low, moderate sets, and longer rests while learning the movements.

Doubles load your body more (no surprise), so it's one way to ramp things up. Anecdotally, it seems like doubles are better for putting on muscle mass and developing pure strength, but a single will still do both of those just fine.

I wouldn't worry too much about it, though; it's generally recommended that people stick with single bell work for at least a year before they try doubles. Besides, it usually takes a heck of a lot longer than a year to “run out” of beneficial things to do with a single bell... Oh, and +1 to what Geoff said.

Doubles load your body more (no surprise), so it's one way to ramp things up. Anecdotally, it seems like doubles are better for putting on muscle mass and developing pure strength, but a single will still do both of those just fine.

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I wouldn't worry too much about it, though; it's generally recommended that people stick with single bell work for at least a year before they try doubles. Besides, it usually takes a heck of a lot longer than a year to “run out” of beneficial things to do with a single bell... Oh, and +1 to what Geoff said.

Women get one more bell because there's more of a difference between upper and lower body strength. Haha, you can definitely stick with just swings and get ups for a long time and gain a lot.

For everyday fitness, you could probably stay with something like Simple and Sinister for years and not have any big deficiencies. @msuwendy, take Pavel Macek's good advice and follow the program he recommends.

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Sources
1 www.t-nation.com - https://www.t-nation.com/training/tip-kettlebells-are-overrated
2 ketologic.com - https://ketologic.com/article/ketologic-kettlebell-guide-for-beginners/
3 www.reddit.com - https://www.reddit.com/r/keto/comments/2s632a/keto_kettlebells/